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Mon Feb 13, 2017, 08:03 PM

Today's evening imbibe is the Martinez

The Martinez is a very old drink that is the precurser to the Martini.

First, a bit of history.
Is it a precursor to the Martini? A cousin? A variation? And what about the Manhattan? The truth will likely never be known, though we can safely assume that the Martini and the Martinez emerged at about the same time. More specifically, they were developed in the late 1860s and into the 1870s, when vermouth became a common ingredient in American cocktails. First created in Italy (Cinzano in 1757, Carpano in 1786, Martini & Rossi in 1863), sweet vermouth, also known as “red” or “Italian” vermouth,was also the first to arrive on these shores; the Martini brand seems to have made up the majority of the import market, likely resulting in the King of Cocktails being named for it. “Dry” or “French” vermouth gained popularity just after the turn of the 20th century, resulting in bar-goers ordering “dry” or “perfect” cocktails, perfect meaning the drink held a blend of dry and sweet vermouths.

Still, there will always be room for debate on the origins of these cocktails. According to historian David Wondrich, theories surrounding the Martini/Martinez fall into two camps: the “martinez” group claims the drink(s) were invented in or near San Francisco, while the “Martine/Martini” theories call New York the home of the Martini. Wondrich has ruled out Jerry Thomas, the famed bartender of the late 1800s, as the inventor of the Martinez, noting that it appeared two years after his death in a later 1887 edition of his Bar-tenders Guide. The Martinez first appears, says Wondrich, in O.H. Byron’s 1884 Modern Bartender’s Guide, though without any mention of its origins. The Martinez may very well have emerged in the town of Martinez in California, spreading rapidly from bartender to bartender in the booming 1860s-70s San Francisco bar scene.

There was, however, a cocktail called the Turf Club that appeared in the anonymously-authored How To Mix Drinks–Bar-Keeper’s Handbook from 1884. The Turf Club, with the exception of maraschino liqueur, is essentially identical to the Martinez. Perhaps the addition of maraschino was a modification to make a “fancy” Martini or Turf Club. Dashes of maraschino, absinthe, or curaçao were frequently added to fancy up American cocktails. The Vermouth Cocktail, from 1869, adds bitters, maraschino, and a lemon twist to chilled vermouth, providing us with yet another alternative.

The first Martinez was almost definitely made with sweet vermouth and Old Tom gin, a sweeter, aged gin prevalent in the 1800s. Most likely, the Martinez was distinguished from a Martini by the addition of maraschino. It was also, according to Gary Regan, ordered as a kind of “gin Manhattan,” substituting gin for whiskey. Jason Wilson mentions the same, noting that Byron’s afore-mentioned Modern Bartender’s Guide gives the following direction for mixing a Martinez: “Same as a Manhattan, only you substitute gin for whisky.” The name, however, remains a mystery.


Martinez (Jerry Thomas )
1 dash of Boker’s Bitters
2 dashes Maraschino Liqueur
1 pony Old Tom Gin
1 wine glass of vermouth

Shake thoroughly with two small lumps of ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a quarter slice of lemon added to the drink. Add two dashes of gum syrup for an extra-sweet drink.


I have substituted Old Tom Gin for Bols Ginever, which is the original Dutch Gin, which was far more popular in the 19th Century than the modern London Dry version. It is malty and earthy. Almost more akin to a white whiskey flavored with Juniper and Botanicals than the modern cousin to Vodka.

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Arrow 8 replies Author Time Post
Reply Today's evening imbibe is the Martinez (Original post)
Currentsitguy Feb 13 OP
Slayer Feb 13 #1
Currentsitguy Feb 13 #2
Slayer Feb 13 #3
Currentsitguy Feb 13 #4
Slayer Feb 13 #5
D26-15 Feb 13 #6
def_con5 Feb 14 #7
Currentsitguy Feb 15 #8

Response to Currentsitguy (Original post)

Mon Feb 13, 2017, 08:10 PM

1. I feel like I'm a member of the playboy club.

 

This oyo I am drinking, suddenly seems, sucky.....

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Response to Slayer (Reply #1)

Mon Feb 13, 2017, 08:16 PM

2. My wife and I have a hobby

Pre-Prohibition cocktails. We actually host a bi-weekly event at our home called Pre-Prohibition cocktail Saturday. We have a small group of friends come over and she mixes a few drinks over several hours and explains the history behind each while we smoke cigars and listen to good classic Jazz. It's actually a lot of fun.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #2)

Mon Feb 13, 2017, 08:29 PM

3. If memory serves.

 

You are in penn. maybe one day we could attend.

You have a standing reservation at casa del slayer.

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Response to Slayer (Reply #3)

Mon Feb 13, 2017, 08:34 PM

4. Mi casa is su casa

So long as you are not offended by a lot of crude language and 8 open humidors of good cigars all are welcome. We are all opinionated but believe hospitality (no pun intended) trumps all and enjoy conviviality with any and all so long as they are not idiots or assholes.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #4)

Mon Feb 13, 2017, 08:38 PM

5. Sounds like fun!

 

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #2)

Mon Feb 13, 2017, 08:50 PM

6. We have something like that down here, except

the old lady tells us which still and what part of the woods the white lightnin' came from
while we sit around and smoke good homegrown weed and listen to Lynyrd Skynyrd and the
Almond Brothers.

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-mozilla-001&hsimp=yhs-001&hspart=mozilla&p=lynyrd+skynyrd+simple+man#id=2&vid=4cf26ba260c204b185df96143a19a57a&action=click

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Response to Currentsitguy (Original post)

Tue Feb 14, 2017, 08:16 PM

7. A wineglass of Vermouth?

I wanted to try this, but that seems like an awful lot.

4 ounces?

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Response to def_con5 (Reply #7)

Wed Feb 15, 2017, 01:10 PM

8. Measurements have changes somewhat in 130 years

My goto mix is 1/2 sweet vermouth, 1/2 dry, 1 oz gin, bitters.

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