Newsidahowolves

Tue May 13, 2014, 08:58 PM

Grey wolf appears in Iowa for first time in 89 years – and is shot dead

Hunter mistook animal for a coyote and escapes being cited despite wolves being a protected species in the state, reports Mongabay

DNA testing has confirmed that an animal shot in February in Iowa's Buchanan County was in fact a wolf, according to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. This is the first confirmed grey wolf (Canis lupus) in the US state since 1925.

Experts believe the wolf likely travelled south from Wisconsin or Minnesota, the latter of which has the largest wolf population in the lower 48.

The Iowa wolf, which was a 65-70 pound healthy female, was shot and killed in February of this year by a hunter who mistook it for a coyote. Although wolves remain a protected species in Iowa, the hunter was not cited, because he believed the animal to be a coyote and has cooperated with authorities, including bringing the wolf to them in the first place.

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/may/12/grey-wolf-iowa-shot-dead

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Reply Grey wolf appears in Iowa for first time in 89 years – and is shot dead (Original post)
Strange Luck May 2014 OP
CaliforniaPeggy May 2014 #1
RapidlyAging May 2014 #2
Silent But Deadly May 2014 #12
brokenbike May 2014 #3
Mr Happy May 2014 #9
News2Me May 2014 #10
Silent But Deadly May 2014 #13
galileosghost May 2014 #14
saundersnorvell May 2014 #26
Juan Rico May 2014 #21
saundersnorvell May 2014 #28
ScreennameStolen May 2014 #35
saundersnorvell May 2014 #37
brokenbike May 2014 #47
EAN32 May 2014 #33
ScreennameStolen May 2014 #36
Tink60 May 2014 #38
EAN32 May 2014 #40
vulturefood May 2014 #41
saundersnorvell May 2014 #49
vulturefood May 2014 #55
saundersnorvell May 2014 #57
frankt8242 May 2014 #54
Sawzall May 2014 #39
ol geezer May 2014 #4
Wingless Sparrow May 2014 #5
Tolk May 2014 #19
Wingless Sparrow May 2014 #20
Tolk May 2014 #22
Troll2 May 2014 #52
UpstateDown May 2014 #7
planetX May 2014 #8
UpstateDown May 2014 #16
News2Me May 2014 #11
UpstateDown May 2014 #17
saundersnorvell May 2014 #32
His Daughter May 2014 #42
News2Me May 2014 #44
His Daughter May 2014 #45
News2Me May 2014 #46
saundersnorvell May 2014 #50
saundersnorvell May 2014 #27
YouKnowItsTrue May 2014 #6
brokenbike May 2014 #15
DIXON71 May 2014 #18
NewDay May 2014 #23
farkas May 2014 #24
LowKeyLiberal May 2014 #25
saundersnorvell May 2014 #29
His Daughter May 2014 #43
Argentina May 2014 #30
Juan Rico May 2014 #48
News2Me May 2014 #51
Juan Rico May 2014 #53
News2Me May 2014 #56
Juan Rico May 2014 #58
CTA102 May 2014 #31
sentient_simian May 2014 #34

Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Tue May 13, 2014, 09:03 PM

1. That is unfortunate.

Hopefully that hunter will know better if he happens to spot another one.

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Tue May 13, 2014, 09:08 PM

2. Too bad the wolf wasn't armed.

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Response to RapidlyAging (Reply #2)

Wed May 14, 2014, 05:58 AM

12. I had that very same sardonic thought.... nt

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Tue May 13, 2014, 09:08 PM

3. A hunter?

This is confusing. For what reason would someone be hunting a coyote?

How often is it heard that 'food on the table' is a valid reason for taking a firearm, usually a rifle or shotgun, into the fields and woods? Do they eat coyote in Iowa?

What am I missing here as being an excusable event?

on edit: why is this tagged as idaho?

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Wed May 14, 2014, 05:07 AM

9. idaho and iowa both start with i's and both have three syllables and both have one o and one a!

therefore they are almost the same state!

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Wed May 14, 2014, 05:29 AM

10. I don't know about Iowa, but a lot of people around my part of the country

consider coyotes to be nuisance animals and advocate killing them indiscriminately.

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Wed May 14, 2014, 06:00 AM

13. Are they regarded as pests out that way? Destroyers of farm animals?

That's often a reason to hunt them, because they are eating a rancher's livestock.

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Wed May 14, 2014, 06:23 AM

14. in the west coyotes are considered pests

 

usually by SWPL's with their little dogs and cats that they let run around in their backyards.

coyote jumps the fence and chomps mr whiskers or little fifi and even a contributing PETA sycophant is out for dingo blood.

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Response to galileosghost (Reply #14)

Wed May 14, 2014, 05:50 PM

26. Lol...nice...

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Wed May 14, 2014, 01:32 PM

21. Coyotes are considered "varmints" and are hunted recreationally.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varmint_hunting

The term varmint is a US colloquial term for vermin, though it refers more specifically to mammal or bird pests, including:

Predators, such as coyotes, wolves, foxes, or feral dogs, which can kill farm animals
Rodents, such as rats, prairie dogs, squirrels, rabbits, and groundhogs, that can damage cropland or pastures or carry disease
Other small mammals, such as raccoons and rabbits
Invasive species, such as starlings, that are displacing desirable native species

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Wed May 14, 2014, 06:05 PM

28. Coyotes have over populated

Resulting in disease. Mange killed millions just a few years ago. The overpopulation occurred since the value of their hides dropped off with fur coats becoming unpopular. Coyotes run in packs out here. Last spring a pack came through and ate 10 of my 12 chickens. They eat our farm cats and will eat dogs too. I shoot one or 2 per year that show little fear and hang around ourfarmstead. There are millions of acres they can occupy without being at my house.

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Response to saundersnorvell (Reply #28)

Thu May 15, 2014, 03:52 AM

35. So clearly you know what one looks like

and able to distinguish between the two?

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Response to ScreennameStolen (Reply #35)

Thu May 15, 2014, 07:44 AM

37. Hard to say

There are color variations. In the winter months their coats get very thick (on healthy animals) and they get a more defined cowl where the hair is longer around the neck much like a wolf. A large male can get over 60 pounds, this animal was 70...not enough bigger to make someone look harder.

Since this guy took it to the authorities, my inclination is to think it wasn't, 'whoa, there's a wolf...bang', instead I suspect it was, 'there's one (a coyote), bang, (walked up on it) wait a minute. ..' If there had been no wolves in Iowa in 75 years, wolf probably wasn't even in his mind. ..it wouldn't have been in mine when I was growing up in Nebraska.

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Response to saundersnorvell (Reply #37)

Sat May 17, 2014, 12:26 AM

47. Well stated and easily understood now.

Especially the reality of your train of though (his train of thought). Put that way, why would anyone do or think differently.

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Wed May 14, 2014, 09:06 PM

33. Its fun

I hunt coyotes because its fun. Period. Everything else I hunt also falls into the fun catagory and some into the lets eat it catagory. In fact I just had venison tacos, yummy.

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Response to EAN32 (Reply #33)

Thu May 15, 2014, 03:53 AM

36. You kill because it's fun

What makes it fun for you?

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Response to EAN32 (Reply #33)

Thu May 15, 2014, 11:51 AM

38. Hopefully you hunt more skillfully

than you write.

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Response to Tink60 (Reply #38)

Thu May 15, 2014, 03:39 PM

40. Probably not.

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Response to EAN32 (Reply #33)

Thu May 15, 2014, 06:15 PM

41. That's not hunting

That's sport killing. Hunting is done for food.

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Response to vulturefood (Reply #41)

Sat May 17, 2014, 07:52 AM

49. Few people actually hunt for food anymore

There are some, for most people the money they spend for the meat they get would make the meat $100 lb. For me it was outdoor time spent with my dad. Later in high school and college I hunted by myself a lot. The meat was a bonus, the payoff was the solitude of the wilds, fresh air, exercise, using my knowledge of game habits. This isn't to say I hunted game and didn't use it.

For years up until around the early 1980s winter coyote hides were $30 to $100 each. I hunted them some. There were some who would hunt them in trucks and drive on anyone's ground to get them, or drive trucks with 2 or 3 dogs in the back that would chase the coyotes down and pack kill them. Bottom line though was coyote populations were healthy and there was enough food to sustain them for the most part with minimal effect on domestic animals.

The term 'hunting' isn't exclusive to meat animals, it is pursuing wildlife for what ever purpose.

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Response to saundersnorvell (Reply #49)

Sat May 17, 2014, 11:51 AM

55. As long as its not wasted

I'm ok with fur for warmth and meat to eat. Killing for horns, heads or anything else where most of the animal is left to waste I oppose.

You hunt for time in wild? Hunt with a camera. If you kill it, honor it.

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Response to vulturefood (Reply #55)

Sat May 17, 2014, 01:16 PM

57. That is what I have done for most of the last

20 years. I have more money tied up in camera gear than guns. About the only hunting I do now is helping my fil cull deer populations on his farm land. The goal isn't to wipe them out, just control their numbers.

I once knew a guy who bragged about taking trophy deer on state and federal land out of season and selling the antlers. I called wildlife and parks, he invited me to go with him one night, I declined after I found out where he was going. He was arrested that night...how unfortunate...

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Response to vulturefood (Reply #41)

Sat May 17, 2014, 10:04 AM

54. "sport killing"

 

Now....There's an oxymoron fer ya!!

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Response to brokenbike (Reply #3)

Thu May 15, 2014, 01:06 PM

39. I thought this thread was about wolves, not coyotes.

In any event, regarding coyotes, none of the hunters I know eat them. However, hunters do eat the deer that coyotes kill, which is why coyotes are generally viewed as 'nuisance' animals. At least in this area.

Disclaimer: I don't hunt. I'm just explaining the mindset of people around here who do.

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Tue May 13, 2014, 09:44 PM

4. A hunter?

And they couldn't tell a wolf from a coyote?

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Response to ol geezer (Reply #4)

Tue May 13, 2014, 09:47 PM

5. That was my first thought too.

Anyone who cannot tell a wolf from a coyote should not be toting a gun!

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Response to Wingless Sparrow (Reply #5)

Wed May 14, 2014, 11:27 AM

19. I have a coyote

He is almost identical to a mexican wolf.

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Response to Tolk (Reply #19)

Wed May 14, 2014, 01:21 PM

20. A Mexican wolf in the north?

I bet no one up north would recognize a Mexican wolf, and I still would be surprised that this wolf resembled a coyote.

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Response to Wingless Sparrow (Reply #20)

Wed May 14, 2014, 01:41 PM

22. coyotes come in a variety

Of colors and sizes.. I don't know what sort of coyotes are up in that part of the country.
But my coyote looks like a wolf, I had to do a little research when I got him to figure out which he was.

So I can see someone someone making a mistake and shooting rhe wrong critter

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Response to Wingless Sparrow (Reply #5)

Sat May 17, 2014, 09:03 AM

52. Coyote-Wolf Hybrids Have Spread Across U.S. East

Hybrid offspring of coyotes and wolves have spread south along the eastern seaboard, a new DNA study confirms.

Scientists already knew that some coyotes, which have been gradually expanding their range eastward, mated with wolves in the Great Lakes (map) region. The pairings created viable hybrid offspring—identified by their DNA and skulls—that have been found in mid-Atlantic states such as New York and Pennsylvania.

Now, new DNA analysis of coyote poop shows for the first time that some coyotes in the state of Virginia are also part wolf. Scientists think these animals are coyote-wolf hybrids that traveled south from New England along the Appalachian Mountains.

The study also identified another coyote migration route moving through the southern states.

"You have a situation where you have these two waves of coyotes coming into the mid-Atlantic, a terminus for coyote colonization," said study leader Christine Bozarth, a former research fellow at the Center for Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/11/111107-hybrids-coyotes-wolf-virginia-dna-animals-science/

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Response to ol geezer (Reply #4)

Wed May 14, 2014, 01:08 AM

7. Have you ever seen what coyotes do to sheep, dogs, cattle



They can become invasive when new subdivisions go up, chasing out deer and rabbits, and their food chain is disrupted.

Then they prey on domesticated animals

You do not want to find your dog after the way they kill it, believe me.

Yes, they should be allowed to live in the wild, but as long as they are having their habitat encroached more and more, farmers and pet owners may have to kill them from time to time.

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Response to UpstateDown (Reply #7)

Wed May 14, 2014, 03:03 AM

8. hella yeah

I live in the West and you don't let a house cat or a smaller dog out, else the coyotes will kill them in a pack. People shoot at them all the time here.

Too far west to have to worry about grey wolves, but I wouldn't want to see one if I were a rancher.

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Response to planetX (Reply #8)

Wed May 14, 2014, 08:29 AM

16. I would not shoot a wolf or coyote uprovoked

Wolves tend to be shy and don't normally hunt in packs around here.

Now, if it attacked someone I loved, hell yes

But coyotes kill a dog by each taking a limb and pulling.
It is wretched.

They gotta eat and I admire the coyote, but I love my dog far more

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Response to UpstateDown (Reply #7)

Wed May 14, 2014, 05:32 AM

11. And if we keep encroaching on the wild spaces and eliminating their food sources

where are they to go and what are they to eat?

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Response to News2Me (Reply #11)

Wed May 14, 2014, 08:32 AM

17. Well, that is the question, isn't it

It's the reason we have 'federal lands" set aside, so native flora and fauna can have a refuge.

But the Bundy-ites of the world want ALL the lands.

People will have to fight to keep every square acre of this country from becoming a host to corporate parasites.

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Response to News2Me (Reply #11)

Wed May 14, 2014, 08:26 PM

32. There are millions of them in the wild

Vast spaces out here fields, treelines and grasslands where coyote populations thrive. In the 80s the state, using only funds from hunting licenses, bought and placed turkeys on public lands and state parks. This was key in overcoming disease caused by malnutrition. Now turkeys are abundant in every part of the state. Bobcat populations are at all time highs. Modern wildlife management has improved healthy populations.

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Response to News2Me (Reply #11)

Fri May 16, 2014, 11:32 AM

42. Where is encroachment happening these days?

Not a lot of building going on in the US, especially not in "wild spaces".

Coyotes are actually increasing their range (moving east) and finding success, even in urban areas.

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Response to His Daughter (Reply #42)

Fri May 16, 2014, 03:38 PM

44. Actually, it's happening in the area where I work.

This area is part of a former military base and has just recently been opened up for construction. Businesses and housing are going up really fast. The deer population in this area is such that they have started urban bow hunting to reduce the numbers.

About 30 minutes ago I was sitting at my desk and saw a young coyote pass within 50 ft. of the building where I work. I watched as he crossed the road and disappeared into the brush in an area that has not yet been developed. He is pretty much surrounded by civilization right now and I don't see any "wild spaces" for him to move to.

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Response to News2Me (Reply #44)

Fri May 16, 2014, 04:14 PM

45. Housing and new building is at a low in most parts of the country

and there is real pressure/incentive to bring people into the cites from outlying areas. I have lived on a number of military bases and would not consider any of them "wild spaces" except for places China Lake and Irwin. Yours would be an exception. Do you mind sharing which base?

Deer are a pest (except in California), not bad eating, and a terror to motorcycles.

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Response to His Daughter (Reply #45)

Fri May 16, 2014, 06:19 PM

46. I work in the Chaffee Crossing area of Fort Smith, AR. Fort Chaffee was pretty much moth-balled

a few years ago and a large portion of it was given to the City of Fort Smith for commercial and residential use. Several large corporations have moved into the area, housing is going up all over the place, a new high school and a medical training school are planned and I-49 is being built through the area. Most of the growth in the area is moving in this direction and wildlife is feeling the squeeze. The small towns that were on the outskirts of the military base are now bedroom communities and they are building up fast. This may not be the norm for most of the country, but that's what is happening here.

The people who are moving into the area keep saying that there is an overpopulation of deer, but I have to wonder if it isn't humans who are overpopulated.

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Response to His Daughter (Reply #45)

Sat May 17, 2014, 08:02 AM

50. Fort Riley and Camp Pendleton both have vast areas of

Wildlife. Fort Riley allows hunting deer, coyotes, turkeys, ducks, upland game birds, etc. last I knew.

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Response to ol geezer (Reply #4)

Wed May 14, 2014, 05:54 PM

27. It was 70 lbs, a large male coyote coyote can weigh

60 lbs....

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Tue May 13, 2014, 11:55 PM

6. Wishing the hunter much bad karma.

Why ya gotta kill?

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 07:24 AM

15. Nice to pick up a double education -

The reason why Iowa and Idaho are the same, foolish of me, and the 'nuissance' factor of the coyote.

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 11:05 AM

18. SAD

SHOOT 1ST ASK QUESTIONS LATER SMH

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 03:32 PM

23. what a damned shame... n/t

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 04:50 PM

24. Disgusting on many levels...

For one thing, wolves and other apex predators are necessary for a healthy environment. Only the hunters don't like them because they compete for game. Plus, the sick freaks get the added bonus of getting to kill the wolves.

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 05:03 PM

25. Poor woofy. nt

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 06:08 PM

29. Too bad

At least the guy did the right thing.

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Response to saundersnorvell (Reply #29)

Fri May 16, 2014, 11:33 AM

43. Good point

Most people would just bury it and shut up.

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 06:37 PM

30. Wolves are beautiful animals.

It's a pity this one was shot.

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Response to Argentina (Reply #30)

Sat May 17, 2014, 01:24 AM

48. Does that mean that it's not a pity when an animal that isn't beautiful (say, a feral hog) is shot?

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Response to Juan Rico (Reply #48)

Sat May 17, 2014, 08:29 AM

51. The difference, IMHO, is that the feral hog is a non-native,

invasive species. The wolf is part of the natural ecology of this continent.

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Response to News2Me (Reply #51)

Sat May 17, 2014, 09:46 AM

53. You don't see anyone proposing to re-introduce grizzly bears to Illinois or Ohio...

Even though grizzlies used to roam there as part of the natural ecology of those areas.

We've displaced a number of megafauna by our sheer presence, and short of us leaving certain areas, the presence of those animals isn't going to be tolerated. This obviously doesn't apply to states with vast areas of wilderness and low population densities such as Wyoming or Alaska.

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Response to Juan Rico (Reply #53)

Sat May 17, 2014, 12:05 PM

56. Actually, black bears have been re-introduced into many areas where they were once

numerous and are doing quite well. I have even heard some recent discussion about introducing Florida panthers to other states where they might be able to gain a foothold.

http://www.cougarnet.org/Florida%20Panther%20%20Artical.htm

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Response to News2Me (Reply #56)

Sat May 17, 2014, 03:04 PM

58. Well, there's a big difference between how black bears interact with humans vs. grizzlies.

Heck, I've had black bears on my porch munching on the bird feeder...

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Wed May 14, 2014, 06:41 PM

31. We let millions of yahoos like that carry gunz on city streets every day.

 

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Response to Strange Luck (Original post)

Thu May 15, 2014, 03:06 AM

34. where was MS Palin at the time.

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