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Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:02 AM

Piece Found at Boeing 737 Crash Site Shows Jet Was Set to Dive

A screw-like device found in the wreckage of the Boeing Co. 737 Max 8 that crashed Sunday in Ethiopia has provided investigators with an early clue into what happened, as work begins in France to decode the black boxes recovered from the scene.

The so-called jackscrew, used to set the trim that raises and lowers the plane’s nose, indicates the jet was configured to dive, based on a preliminary review, according to a person familiar with the investigation. The evidence helped persuade U.S. regulators to ground the model, said the person, who requested anonymity to discuss the inquiry.

France’s aviation safety agency BEA received the cockpit voice and data recorders on Thursday for decoding, while investigators on the scene near Addis Ababa continue to sift through the plane’s wreckage. The second crash in five months has thrown Boeing into a crisis, sending the shares plunging and raising questions about the future of its best-selling jet.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-03-15/piece-found-in-crash-wreckage-said-to-show-jet-was-set-to-dive

9 replies, 161 views

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Response to Troll2 (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:05 AM

1. Anonymous source?

I'll wait for something official to be announced.

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Response to foia (Reply #1)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:12 AM

2. Investigators find new clues pointing to potential cause of 737 MAX crashes as FAA details Boeings

Investigators on the ground near the crash site of the Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX found the plane’s jackscrew, a part that moves the horizontal tail of the aircraft, and it indicates that the tail was in an unusual position, according to an aviation safety consultant briefed on the findings.

The consultant, John Cox, chief executive of Safety Operating Systems and formerly the top safety official for the Air Line Pilots Association, said that Boeing’s new flight control system on the MAX — implicated in the preliminary investigation into the earlier crash of a Lion Air jet in Indonesia — is one of several possible systems that could explain the unusual deflection in the horizontal tail, a control surface that swivels to pitch the plane’s nose up or down.

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/investigators-find-new-clues-to-potential-cause-of-737-max-crashes-as-faa-details-boeings-fix/

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Response to Troll2 (Reply #2)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:22 AM

3. OK. That's a lot better than an anonymous source.

And MCAS seems to be a likely suspect but it's still best to wait for a final report.

"one of several possible systems"

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Response to foia (Reply #3)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:44 AM

5. I don't think that Boeing wants to keep the MAX grounded for 6 months to a year

More months of tests and analysis eventually lead to the preparation of a draft final report by Safety Board staff. Parties do not participate in the analysis and report writing phase of NTSB investigations; however, they are invited to submit their proposed findings of cause and proposed safety recommendations, which are made part of the public docket. The Board then deliberates over the final report in a public Board meeting in Washington, D.C. Non-Safety Board personnel, including parties and family members, cannot interact with the Board during that meeting.

Once a major report is adopted at a Board Meeting, an abstract of that report - containing the Board's conclusions, probable cause and safety recommendations - is placed on the Board's web site under "Publications". The full report typically appears on the web site several weeks later.

https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/process/pages/default.aspx

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Response to Troll2 (Reply #5)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 11:13 AM

6. Boeing is already taking action. I guarantee it.

Boeing has their own teams of investigators on call 24/7 to immediately fly to crash scenes wherever in the world they occur. (I have a step-brother who does this as his job at Boeing.)

And you can bet Boeing has been looking into this hard and devoting a lot of resources to this since the Lion Air crash.

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Response to foia (Reply #6)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 11:36 AM

7. It's probably hard to fix and still maintain that pilots don't need specific training to fly the MAX

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Response to Troll2 (Reply #7)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 12:29 PM

8. Not sure what you mean by that but of course Boeing, carriers and the FAA

will be updating manuals, training requirements and simulators to address any issues that arise from these two incidents.

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Response to foia (Reply #8)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 01:01 PM

9. A key selling point of the MAX was no pilot retraining required. It was to be just another 737.

So carriers around the world flying the 737 could add a few MAX to their fleet without the cost of new simulators, new pilot training, etc.


737 Max software was updated; pilots weren't

IN THE brutally competitive jetliner business, the announcement in late 2010 that Airbus would introduce a more fuel-efficient version of its best-selling A320 amounted to a frontal assault on its archrival Boeing's workhorse 737.

Boeing scrambled to counterpunch. Within months, it came up with a plan for an upgrade of its own, the 737 Max, featuring engines that would yield similar fuel savings. And in the years that followed, Boeing pushed not just to design and build the new plane, but to convince its airline customers and, crucially, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), that the new model would fly safely and handle enough like the existing model that 737 pilots would not have to undergo costly retraining.

Boeing's strategy set off a cascading series of engineering, business and regulatory decisions that years later would leave the company facing difficult questions about the crash in October of a Lion Air 737 Max off Indonesia. The causes of the crash, which killed 189 people, are still under investigation.

https://www.businesstimes.com.sg/transport/737-max-software-was-updated-pilots-werent

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Response to Troll2 (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:24 AM

4. ''according to a person familiar with the investigation''...looks like someone needs FIRED.

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