Politicspoliticsahhhhoprahantivaxantiscienceshadilaykekkekistanredpilldank

Wed Jan 10, 2018, 10:26 AM

How Oprah Helped Spread Anti-Vaccine Pseudoscience

"Calls for Oprah Winfrey to run for president may have begun as a joke, but in the wake of her rousing Golden Globes speech, speculation has swirled. CNN even ran live updates on a potential “Oprah 2020” campaign on Monday. President Donald Trump told reporters he doubts Winfrey will run, though he also declared he would win a campaign against her.

Some progressives welcomed the idea that Winfrey, a popular media icon whose star power could eclipse even that of Trump, might take on the president in 2020. Winfrey, who endorsed Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, is well know for championing a wide range of important causes, such as promoting reading and founding the Leadership Academy for Girls in Johannesburg, South Africa. But there’s one area in which Winfrey and her would-be opponent are surprisingly alike: Both she and Trump have helped spread the inaccurate—and dangerous—myth that vaccines cause autism or other health problems.

The supposed link between autism and vaccines has been repeatedly and unequivocally debunked by scientists and public health officials. (See here, here, here, here, here and here, for starters.) The theory has roots in an error-filled (and later retracted) 1998 British study claiming a link between autism and vaccines. Following the paper’s publication, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination rates dropped in Britain, and measles cases rose sharply in the ensuing years. Researchers reported a decline in US vaccination rates. Years later, the discredited theory continues to negatively impact public health.

Winfrey’s role in this controversy dates back to 2007, when she brought Jenny McCarthy, the Playboy model and actress, onto her show to talk about autism. McCarthy’s young son, Evan, had suffered a series of seizures at two-and-a-half years old and was later diagnosed with autism. McCarthy was adamant that the MMR vaccination Evan received as a baby caused his autism. On the show, McCarthy told Oprah she had been instinctually uncomfortable with allowing the doctor to give her son the vaccine. “I said to the doctor, I have a very bad feeling about this shot,” McCarthy recounted. “This is the autism shot, isn’t it?”"

Balance of article at the link: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2018/01/how-oprah-helped-spread-anti-vaccine-pseudoscience/

6 replies, 379 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 6 replies Author Time Post
Reply How Oprah Helped Spread Anti-Vaccine Pseudoscience (Original post)
Muddling Through Jan 2018 OP
CoveredBridge Jan 2018 #1
def_con5 Jan 2018 #5
rahtruelies Jan 2018 #2
Muddling Through Jan 2018 #3
NavyBrat Jan 2018 #6
Fiendish Thingy-BC Jan 2018 #4

Response to Muddling Through (Original post)


Response to CoveredBridge (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 10, 2018, 05:32 PM

5. Then no problem

No Mercury,Thimerosal (not pure mercury) is only used in the flu shot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Muddling Through (Original post)

Wed Jan 10, 2018, 11:17 AM

2. ********************* CLASSIC FAKE NEWS ALERT************

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to rahtruelies (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 10, 2018, 11:25 AM

3. That's about the stupidest post I've seen ever.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Muddling Through (Reply #3)

Wed Jan 10, 2018, 05:40 PM

6. Stick around. It can get even better.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Muddling Through (Original post)

Wed Jan 10, 2018, 11:32 AM

4. This alone should disqualify her from the presidency nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Politicspoliticsahhhhoprahantivaxantiscienceshadilaykekkekistanredpilldank