Politicspolitics

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 03:24 AM

BUSH'S FINEST 30 SECONDS: THE WILLIE HORTON AD

http://www.anncoulter.com/



The press in America is even worse than we imagine. We sense that they're biased and stunningly incompetent. They are those things, but so much more. Our media's version of the news is mathematically and precisely the opposite of the truth.

The death and burial of George H.W. Bush is only the latest example.

In the puffery and revisionism that accompany funerals, the man who gave us David Souter, an unnecessary war, tax hikes he promised not to impose and the Americans With Disabilities Act (aka The Destruction of Small Libraries Throughout New England Act) has been elevated to saintlike status.

But the one incident the media decided to excoriate Bush for was, in fact, his finest moment: the Willie Horton ad.

If we let the media get away with this, they will have once again redefined what constitutes acceptable discourse in America and cemented the notion that our political process should never be soiled by such a campaign ad -- the one thing Bush got right in his entire public career.

Far from representing the "low road," the Willie Horton ad was the greatest campaign commercial in political history. The ad was the reason we have political campaigns: It clearly and forcefully highlighted the two presidential candidates' diametrically opposed views on an issue of vital national importance.

Bush's opponent, Gov. Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts, had championed a self-evidently insane criminal justice program that provided prison furloughs to first-degree murderers.

One of the murderers let out under Dukakis' program was a career violent criminal, Willie Horton. In 1974, Horton sliced up a 17-year-old convenience store clerk, Joey Fournier, in Lawrence, Massachusetts, after Fournier had already handed over all the money. He then stuffed the boy's corpse in a garbage can. That wasn't Horton's first offense: Years earlier, he'd been convicted of attempted murder for stabbing a man in South Carolina.

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Arrow 7 replies Author Time Post
Reply BUSH'S FINEST 30 SECONDS: THE WILLIE HORTON AD (Original post)
Solesurvivor Dec 6 OP
imwithfred Dec 6 #1
Dumper Dec 6 #2
Carl Dec 6 #3
Solesurvivor Dec 6 #5
Gamle-ged Dec 6 #4
saspamco Dec 6 #6
Duke Lacrosse Dec 6 #7

Response to Solesurvivor (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 05:11 AM

1. Uh huh. i remember the Willie Horton controversy.

I thought it was great, advertising that atrocity. The news media and the Demos didn't like it, but the news media and the Demos usually run contrary to that which should be done.

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Response to Solesurvivor (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 06:52 AM

2. Didn't 41 steal that from a D?

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Response to Dumper (Reply #2)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 07:31 AM

3. I believe it originated with Dick Gephart.

On edit I stand corrected,should have looked first.
It was a general issue brought up by Gore.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Horton

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Response to Dumper (Reply #2)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 08:26 AM

5. Never heard that, i thought it came from 41's team

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Response to Solesurvivor (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 08:08 AM

4. That was a very effective ad...

The ad shows a line of convicts (portrayed by actors) casually walking in and out of a prison (filmed in Draper, Utah) by means of a revolving door. The narration states that as governor of Massachusetts, Dukakis vetoed mandatory minimum sentencing for drug dealers, that he vetoed the death penalty, and that he gave weekend furloughs to first-degree murderers. The narrator goes on to point out that while furloughed, many of the convicts committed crimes including kidnapping and rape, and are still at large. The ad concludes with the phrase: "Now Michael Dukakis says he wants to do for America what he's done for Massachusetts. America can't afford that risk." The disclaimer at the end indicates the ad was paid for and endorsed by the Bush/Quayle campaign.

- - - - -

WIKI

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Response to Solesurvivor (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 08:59 AM

6. You'd figure that the Willie Horton ad would still get Ann Coulter hot.

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Response to Solesurvivor (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 10:30 AM

7. I thought the Willie Horton ad was powerful. One vivid memory I have is Maxine Waters shreaking...

...about Willie Horton being "a victim of racism."

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