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Thu Dec 6, 2018, 11:35 AM

Several basic questions to test your views/beliefs on affirmative action (AA) or reparations?

Who is most deserving of AA's application or reparations:

1) The kid of a Black* Millionaire or the kid of a poor white WV coal miner? Or a white descendant of indentured servants?

2) A Black* kid who came to America recently or the descendant of American slaves? (Think of Obama whose father was an African citizen).

3) A Black* who came here voluntarily or one whose ancestors came here involuntarily. What if they were descended from African slave traders?

4) An indigenous Indian or a Black?

5) A Black slave descendent who graduated from Harvard or a poor white who failed Junior College?



Feel free to substitute Hispanic.*

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Reply Several basic questions to test your views/beliefs on affirmative action (AA) or reparations? (Original post)
Dumper Dec 6 OP
Duke Lacrosse Dec 6 #1
Ruby Dec 6 #2
quad489 Dec 6 #3
nolens volens Dec 6 #4
Duke Lacrosse Dec 6 #6
rampartb Dec 6 #5

Response to Dumper (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 11:52 AM

1. None of the above.

Another way to look at the issue would be to ask who would bear liability for reparations, or be most deserving of being denied employment, education, etc. because of their race. Again I say nobody.

Several generations have passed since slavery was banned in the USA. Our justice system doesn't include punishment for the crimes of a person's ancestors. (Not to mention that most of us have NO ancestors who ever owned slaves.) With exceptions for unpaid medical bills in some states, our economic system doesn't allow for inheritance of debt.

The price of ending slavery was paid during the Civil War and subsequent Reconstruction.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #1)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:09 PM

2. This.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #1)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:26 PM

3. Hear!! Hear!!

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #1)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:36 PM

4. This is true however,

we've never honestly addressed the reality of what the Federal Government did with the FHA and redlining to restrict the ability of African Americans to build home equity wealth from the 1930s through the 1960s.

How do you fix that? I'm thinking direct reparations won't work but how about low interest or no interest home loans for those whose parents were denied access to the suburbs through direct interference from the government that was supposed to treat them as equals?

While white folks parents and grandparents were getting decent FHA loans for over 30 years during the massive housing buildup from the end of the depression through the sixties blacks were denied those same loans in those same suburbs for no reason other than being black.

Consequently black families on average were never able to build the kind equity based generational wealth that white parents were able to build to finance educations and to pass some wealth on to their heirs.

Just ending the discrimination in no way fixes the reality of the original discrimination's effect on black family stability and wealth creation.

I'm not seeking to place blame, I'm genuinely asking how do we make something like that right today? Like I state earlier I think access to below cost loans might be a start, then you're not giving anyone anything but you are trying to reset the wealth table to include those who were denied a seat originally.

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Response to nolens volens (Reply #4)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 01:07 PM

6. I don't believe there is any practical way to avenge the sins of the past. Banks now have to comply

...with the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) which requires banks to actively work to ensure that the credit needs of low and moderate income communities are met. A medium-sized bank typically has several full-time people doing nothing but CRA compliance work, which includes documenting and publishing how the bank complies, plus every bank employee has to get annual CRA training regardless of their job function.

The regulators (e.g. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency) plus internal and external auditors spend a lot of bandwidth scrutinizing lending policies, procedures, and CRA compliance. A bank can be shut down very quickly for repeated violations.

CRA compliance compels financial institutions to provide services to communities that they would likely stay out of, if they had a choice, and it is not without controversy. Some people put some of the blame for the 2008 financial crisis on actions that banks took to ensure CRA compliance.

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/community_reinvestment_act.asp

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Response to Dumper (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2018, 12:56 PM

5. there will be no reparations

in 1866 the issue should have been settled with 40 acres and a mule.

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