Cultureculturesubculturecrimeevilhumananimalisticbrutal

Mon Jul 13, 2015, 07:43 PM

Crime brutal atrocious evil animalistic

I never posted a thread about any crime, real or fiction. But here I want to post something about crime, which is a big topic (it seems) on this board.

Instead of posting actual crimes with not-so-subtle about who-and-who, which-race-and-which-subculture committing crimes, which brings about an open war on "Black/White subculture are criminal.." raising anger, blood pressure, which are bad for your health and defeat the purpose of this board, which is to have fun poking each other a little, why don't we pour it onto some other cultures that aren't here and can't defend themselves?

We have statistics that say whites commit certain % of crimes, blacks commit certain % of crimes. But neither is 100%.

You know where it is worse? Take China, Japan. I'm pretty sure that Japanese commit 99.9% of crimes in Japan, a ratio higher than both blacks' and whites'. Same crime rate in China or for that matter, Korea, Taiwan as well!

See, it is not so bad here. Those people are terrible, they have murderers, rapists, violent criminals.. nearly 100% committed by them.

Neither blacks nor whites in America nor any subculture thereof come close to cornering 100% market of violent crimes.

How bad are the Chinese and Japanese? They are so violent that even as swords and guns are outlawed to suppress crimes, they invented karate, which means "the bare-hand way," as a mean to kill people without weapons. They know that no government can ban arms or legs or 5-point-finger whatever...

Their culture also have roving gangs of killers. Knockout game or polar bear hunting is lame compared to what these guys do. They chop heads, torsos, arms, legs,... So the next time you see a gang of 7 Japanese in kimono wielding katana, you'd better watch out.



So.. please stop beating ourselves about crimes in America, it is worse in many places out there!

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Arrow 20 replies Author Time Post
Reply Crime brutal atrocious evil animalistic (Original post)
Hypothesis Jul 2015 OP
Gamle-ged Jul 2015 #1
Hypothesis Jul 2015 #2
Da Mannn Jul 2015 #5
fncceo Jul 2015 #3
Hypothesis Jul 2015 #4
fncceo Jul 2015 #6
Hypothesis Jul 2015 #7
fncceo Jul 2015 #11
Hypothesis Jul 2015 #18
fncceo Jul 2015 #20
Duke Lacrosse Jul 2015 #8
fncceo Jul 2015 #9
Duke Lacrosse Jul 2015 #10
fncceo Jul 2015 #12
Duke Lacrosse Jul 2015 #13
fncceo Jul 2015 #14
Duke Lacrosse Jul 2015 #15
fncceo Jul 2015 #16
Duke Lacrosse Jul 2015 #17
Hypothesis Jul 2015 #19

Response to Hypothesis (Original post)

Mon Jul 13, 2015, 08:20 PM

1. A secret camera recorded this encounter... shhhhh...

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #1)

Mon Jul 13, 2015, 09:02 PM

2. I like the original series better :)

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #1)

Mon Jul 13, 2015, 10:38 PM

5. Blind Kung Fu Master

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Response to Hypothesis (Original post)

Mon Jul 13, 2015, 09:10 PM

3. Japanese Crime statistics

Strangely enough, Japanese regularly publish crime statistics for Japanese and non-Japanese. Non-Japanese (nearly 2% of the population) consists mostly of ethnic Koreans and Chinese (descendants of slave labour brought to Japan during their empire days) born and raised in Japan who cannot become citizens because of their ethnic heritage.

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Response to fncceo (Reply #3)

Mon Jul 13, 2015, 09:27 PM

4. I'm not an expert of their country, so I don't know. Some here might have lived there

for a long period of time and may know better. But it felt pretty safe when I traveled there.

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Response to Hypothesis (Reply #4)

Mon Jul 13, 2015, 10:43 PM

6. I lived in Japan for many years ...

... and speak the language passably. Violent crime, robbery, burglary, and murder are rare there. Partly because of the homogenous society and not a little because of the lack of privacy. Everyone knows what you're up to.

Another factor that reduces random crime is that organised is so pervasive and they don't tolerate competition. If you rob a liquor store you have more to fear from the Yakuza who are being paid protection by that store owner than from the Japanese police, who are widely seen as laughably inept.

Yakuza even cooperate with police in stemming random crime in Japan.

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Response to fncceo (Reply #6)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 08:12 AM

7. Interesting. Just a quick note.

You wrote "Violent crime, robbery, burglary, and murder are rare there. Partly because of the homogenous society". Many sociologists take issue with that statement. The debate of diversity and homogeneity goes on and on.... ad infinitum.

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Response to Hypothesis (Reply #7)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:31 AM

11. Japan is not just racially homogenous ...

... although (it is much less racially homogenous that most Japanese would be willing to admit). It is culturally homogenous to a degree seldom seen in most countries. That kind of social cohesiveness brings with it social stability.

Personally, I'd take a little instability over that much cohesiveness.

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Response to fncceo (Reply #11)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 10:37 AM

18. I only say in general (not specific about Japan or other country), that

the sociology of diversity is a complex topic debated often among sociologists. (I'm not). I've been to a couple talks and people can argue whatever they want. Sociology is not a physical science. We have mostly case analyses, not experiments with control.

Here was a debate that I recalled from a speaker and critiques in the audience: diversity in itself is not necessarily a factor of crime: Singapore is racially and culturally very diverse, yet it is very low crime. Asian neighborhoods in the US have low crime rates, but too small for significant statistics. If one takes a group of people from low crime countries (e. g. Scandinavian, Japan) and transplant them to the US into a diverse neighborhood, would these people adopt the local culture and become criminals with a higher crime rate? etc. A lot of debate.

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Response to Hypothesis (Reply #18)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 06:59 PM

20. Singapore is another place where I spend some time (working for 10 years)

Yes, it's diverse, but it hasn't always been peaceful. Prior to its separation from Malaysia in 1963, Singapore was crime-ridden and the site of much racial tension. Post-independence, Singapore has become probably the most clean, orderly and fun-free place on the planet -- I have always called it "Disneyland with no rides". Others say, "Disneyland with a death penalty".

Current Singapore was created from the vision of one man (also like Disneyland), Lee Kuan Yew, the only example in recent history I know of an actual benevolent despot. For 40 years, political dissent was not tolerated. Rule of law is harsh, but low-key. Death for drug trafficking, beatings with a cane for what would be considered misdemeanors in most countries. You rarely seen police on the streets but, when anything happens, they are there, polite, professional, and not dressed like storm troopers, within seconds. People are closely monitored but in a very unobtrusive way.

All religious groups are closely monitored, sermons in churches, mosques and synagogues are reported to the police and any seditious content can merit jail time. Proselytism is strictly forbidden, handing out Jesus pamphlets on a sidewalk can get you arrested (the best law I've ever seen). You can be jailed for defamation of anyone's religion.

80% of housing is government allocated (can be purchased cheaply) and racial quotas are strictly enforced to ensure there is almost no racial segregation.

Another factor is the character of the people themselves. Quality of living in Singapore has been increasing steadily for 50 years. Where there were once slums, there are now modern apartment complexes, in planned communities with shopping and transport and all services, Only one "kampong" (a sort of shanty village once the most common form of community on the island) still exists and it is more of a museum than an actual community. Because of this, people of Singapore are -- rightly -- content. They don't bemoan the loss of liberties because many are still old enough to remember the chaos that existed before Lee Kuan Yew. For a long time, people are content, but just a little bit hesitant to do anything different.

That being said -- in the last 20 years -- that's as long as I've been traveling there regularly, people have been allowed more forum for peaceful dissent. Plays and movies are no longer heavily censored. Political discourse is allowed, but not defamation. But even today, some of the things I've seen written on DI/DU wouldn't get you a time-out, they'd get you jail. And people are much less cautious about the way they act in both public and private. They are -- slowly -- beginning to loosen up.

There isn't "no-crime", there were two murders within a mile of my apartment when I was living there. But, the crime rate is really low.

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Response to fncceo (Reply #3)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:25 AM

8. When my brother and his wife and kids were living in Japan, their house was broken into once.

Five white-gloved officers of their local constabulary came to their home to investigate.

The investigation lasted less than five minutes.

The senior officer, who spoke very good English, explained to my sister-in-law that they would not be able to continue the investigation. He pointed to a dusty footprint at the point where the burglar had entered. It was a sneaker print. "A Japanese burglar would have removed his shoes before entering the house," he explained.

And that was that.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #8)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:27 AM

9. How can you argue with that?

Must have been a gaijin.

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Response to fncceo (Reply #9)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:29 AM

10. Very likely a teenage son of an American military person, but possibly a Japanese criminal...

...cleverly disguised as a foreigner by intentionally not removing his shoes.

In the eyes of the police it was foreigner-on-foreigner crime. A matter for the US military police, not the Japanese civil police (and therefore not reflected in Japan's crime statistics.)

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #10)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:35 AM

12. Very few expats in Japan ...

... are subject to the jurisdiction of the US Military Police.

In five years I had only one dealing with the Japanese police. I had to go to the local divisional HQ to pay a parking fine and write an apology (for parking incorrectly). The whole exercise took most of the day.

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Response to fncceo (Reply #12)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:38 AM

13. My brother is an officer in the US Navy. They were living in Oppama, near Yokosuka Naval Base.

There are many Americans in the area who are under the jurisdiction of the US MPs. A lot of them have families.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #13)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:46 AM

14. I know Naval Station Yokosuka well ...

... and NAS Misawa, and Yokata AFB. The DOD was one of my clients. My point was that only military, GS-workers and their families are subject to / protected by military law. The rest of us (about a million foreign workers not counting Chinese and Koreans who I mentioned previously) working for Japanese or foreign companies are subject to local law.


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Response to fncceo (Reply #14)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:49 AM

15. OK, but I have to wonder whether the murder of a Korean citizen by a Chinese would be reported...

...as a murder in Japanese crime statistics.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #15)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:51 AM

16. Many of those Koreans and Chinese ...

... despite being born in Japan are not citizens of Japan. Their crimes are officially recorded as Crimes by Foreigners.

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Response to fncceo (Reply #16)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 10:30 AM

17. Thank you! It's good when someone provides a credible answer.

So the crimes are tracked, but separately from crimes by Japanese.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #10)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 11:01 AM

19. I have a story

My colleague and I took a taxi. Only much later when the conference started that my colleague reached for his phone to put it on silent. It was not there. When he got back to the hotel, the clerk gave him his phone that was left on the taxi.

My story (when first time in Japan): I had breakfast; a very cute waitress told me she was learning English and eager to practice. I left a good tip for her. She ran after me to return it and explained that one doesn't tip in Japan. It's the culture. I insisted to give her as a gift, not a tip for her service, but she refused. Of course after many years, I now know that a heart-felt and respectful "arigato" counts a lot more than money.

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Cultureculturesubculturecrimeevilhumananimalisticbrutal