Cultureculturegirlswomenrights

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 03:50 PM

 

So ... wotcha doing?

I buy Christmas presents from Plan that support girls and women in the developing world.

And I donate to The Humanitarian Coalition, an international development and aid consortium of Plan, Save the Children, Care, and Oxfam.


A historic victory: How empowered youth ended child marriage in Malawi

For Memory, 20, the issue of child marriage hits close to home.

“When my little sister was just 11 years old, she was forced to marry a man who got her pregnant,” she says.

“At the time, I was young, and thought this was normal. But I quickly realized the devastating impact it had on her when she was further abused in the marriage.”

... Motivated by her sister’s story, Memory joined an incredible group of youth campaigners, supported by Plan International, who have been challenging government to outlaw the practice of child marriage in Malawi.

In 2015, the youth campaigners secured a huge victory when parliament increased the minimum age for marriage in Malawi from 15 to 18 years. However, the new law was undermined by the country’s constitution, and it contained a provision that allowed children to be married from age 16 with a parent’s consent.

So, the youth got back to work and began a global petition to amend this constitutional loophole.

The petition received over 42,000 signatures from people in over 30 different countries, and it was formally presented to the First Lady of Malawi in 2016.



Then in February 2017, after months of rallying and deliberation, a historic constitutional amendment was announced – the practice of child marriage was fully outlawed in Malawi, and the legal loophole was removed. ...


Done anything interesting lately?



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Arrow 25 replies Author Time Post
Reply So ... wotcha doing? (Original post)
i verglas Apr 2017 OP
i verglas Apr 2017 #1
Magyar Heidinn Apr 2017 #2
JaimeBondoJr Apr 2017 #3
Magyar Heidinn Apr 2017 #4
i verglas Apr 2017 #5
JaimeBondoJr Apr 2017 #6
i verglas Apr 2017 #9
JaimeBondoJr Apr 2017 #10
i verglas Apr 2017 #13
Boadicea Apr 2017 #12
762Justice Apr 2017 #7
Grumpy Pickle Apr 2017 #8
ProgressiveTaxation Apr 2017 #24
762Justice Apr 2017 #25
Boadicea Apr 2017 #11
i verglas Apr 2017 #14
TexMex Apr 2017 #17
Boadicea Apr 2017 #21
TexMex Apr 2017 #23
Cold Warrior Apr 2017 #15
Carlos W Bush Apr 2017 #20
Cold Warrior Apr 2017 #22
fszwfnj Apr 2017 #16
Currentsitguy Apr 2017 #18
_eek Apr 2017 #19

Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 04:05 PM

1. for those who missed it in an earlier thread

 

https://www.discussionist.com/1016226002#post9

Community leaders at the forefront of ending female genital cutting
Plan’s projects that focus on FGM involve educating communities, increasing legal protection for girls, and providing medical and psychological support to victims, with the goal to eradicate female circumcision globally by 2030.

Imam El Hadj Zoumana, a community leader in Mali, didn’t agree with Plan at first, but that changed when he began to attend a series of presentations about how painful and horrific circumcision can be, especially when healthcare workers conduct the procedure in unhygienic conditions. FGM can lead to childbirth complications, sexual dysfunction, psychological damage and death from infections in later years.

“I couldn’t hold back my tears after learning about the full scale of atrocity that our girls and women suffer,” Zoumana said.


Men, women and children in a community in Mali sing and dance
at a ceremony to abandon female genital mutilation.

He knows that educating girls and their communities can help to stop the practice. Determined to act, Imam Zoumana set out to abolish female circumcision in his country. The ritual isn’t banned in Mali, and so very few men and women supported his mission.

... Sawo’s and Zoumana’s communities rallied around groups of women who wanted to end the practice. Sawo’s effort is part of a girls’ rights project in 40 communities in Guinea-Bissau. Zoumana succeeded in banning the practice in his village, as did groups in 58 other villages in Mali. He hopes it stays that way.


C'mon, everybody!

Tell us about your adventures in empowering women and girls to resist abuse!

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 04:29 PM

2. "Done anything interesting lately?"

Shot a pile of prarie dogs this morning. Great morning, the rain had stopped and the little targets were anxious for some sunlight. Blam. Blam. Blam.

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Response to Magyar Heidinn (Reply #2)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 04:44 PM

3. Were any of them pregnant?

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Response to JaimeBondoJr (Reply #3)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 04:48 PM

4. Could have been,

Plenty of little ones though.

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 05:20 PM

5. like puppets on a string ...

 

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 06:17 PM

6. I actually spent the day at the Rotary Club District 5330 Assembly.

We think this might be the year we statistically wipe out Polio. Well, everywhere but Afghanistan. They are refusing help from Infidels.

I gave a presentation to over 200 Rotarians about purifying water with solar ovens. It's going to be pitched to Rotary International and if implemented it will be distributed to villages on the African continent as a fuel-free method of securing potable water.

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Response to JaimeBondoJr (Reply #6)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 06:44 PM

9. excellent

 

Access to clean water is very important to the lives of women and girls, who are the ones who must fetch it from a distance if it is not readily available, which is at best a time-consuming and arduous task, and at worst a dangerous one.

And of course clean water is crucial in wiping out polio, along with vaccination, obviously.

My ex-church, for which I have always had considerable respect, was in at the beginning of WaterCan, now the Canadian element of WaterAid.
https://www.wateraidcanada.com/

You are probably familiar with water.org.

http://water.org/water-crisis/womens-crisis/
Empowered women will change the world

In many countries, women are responsible for finding and collecting water for their families. All the water they need for drinking, washing, cooking, cleaning. They walk miles, carry heavy burdens, wait for hours and pay exorbitant prices. The work is back-breaking and all-consuming. Often the water is contaminated, even deadly. In these instances, they face an impossible choice – certain death without water or possible death from illness.

Once they are old enough, girls join this effort. They spend countless hours trying to provide this basic life necessity.

Women also struggle most from the lack of adequate sanitation, the often unspoken part of the water and sanitation crisis. The sanitation crisis for women can be summed up in one word: ‘dignity.’ Around the world, fewer than one person in three has access to a toilet. In many countries, it is not acceptable for a woman to relieve herself during the day. They wait hours for nightfall, just to have privacy. This impacts health and puts their safety at risk. About half of all girls worldwide attend schools without toilets. The lack of privacy causes many girls to drop out when they reach puberty.

The dual aspects of the water crisis – lack of water and of sanitation – lock women in a cycle of poverty. They cannot attend school; they cannot earn an income.

Providing Hope for Generations Ahead

Around the world, women are coming together to address their own needs for water and sanitation. Their strength and courage transforms communities. With the support of Water.org and its local partners, women organize their communities to support a well and take out small loans for household water connections and toilets. They support one another, share responsibility. These efforts make an impact, taking us one step closer to ending the global water crisis.

The results?

Education

Increased girls’ school attendance, level of education and literacy rates, as they no longer need to miss school to secure water for their families and have adequate and separate sanitation facilities.

Health

Improved health for women and girls who no longer have to delay defecation and urination.
Reduced child and maternal mortality as a result of access to safe water, sanitation facilities and improved hygiene during child birth.
Increased dignity and reduced psychological stress for girls and women particularly when symptoms associated with menstruation, pregnancy and childbirth can be managed discreetly.
Reduced physical injury from constant lifting and carrying heavy loads of water.
Reduced risk of rape, sexual assault, and increased safety as women and girls do not have to go to remote and dangerous places to defecate or to fetch water during the night.

Socioeconomic Opportunity

Increased recognition of women as having skills and knowledge outside the scope of their traditional roles.
Strengthened voice for women in their families and communities to negotiate their own needs.
New opportunities for women’s employment as well as greater autonomy and independence.


One of the projects Plan supports, included among the gifts to buy, is school latrines for girls, so they are able to get an education. (I should have pointed out that the gifts I buy are things like chickens and schoolbooks, that the people I "give" them to don't actually get under the tree.)

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Response to i verglas (Reply #9)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 06:48 PM

10. At this point the women and girls still have to go gather wood for boiling water and I'm working to

change that. I don't know why no one had this idea before, but I think when this makes it out of District 5330 we will start to look at the purification of water in places with little rainfall differently.

No fuel needed.

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Response to JaimeBondoJr (Reply #10)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 07:15 PM

13. yes, true

 

And that is an equally big problem. It was why so many women in South Sudanese refugee camps suffered so much.

I guess I misunderstood the "solar ovens" bit -- thinking they used solar heat.

Did you post something about this here before, or did I read about it somewhere else a while ago?

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Response to JaimeBondoJr (Reply #6)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 07:13 PM

12. That's fantastic!

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 06:35 PM

7. I will continue to volunteer

to curbstomp anyone I see mutilating kids here in the US.

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Response to 762Justice (Reply #7)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 06:44 PM

8. I'm with ya 100%

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Response to 762Justice (Reply #7)

Wed Apr 26, 2017, 09:17 PM

24. How many have you stomped so far?....

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Response to ProgressiveTaxation (Reply #24)

Wed Apr 26, 2017, 11:55 PM

25. Havent seen any yet.

Whooped a few wife beaters and some rude folks already though.

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 07:10 PM

11. I'm currently trying to find assistance

For a newly homeless couple that I met yesterday. He had a sign that said, "please help me." He is 22 and she is 19 and both sets of parents have kicked them out. He has a job and they are trying to save up for an apartment. They are currently living in a tent. They look clean ie not obvious drug use signs,. I can give them food, but I am in the process of trying to see if I can get them some agency/charity /shelter help.

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Response to Boadicea (Reply #11)

Sat Apr 22, 2017, 07:27 PM

14. every little bit

 

I was involved in a novel community fundraising effort last year, and one of the presenters was from the local drop-in / winter overnight shelter.

The point she stressed was the isolation that homelessness breeds, and the feelings of worthlessness that result. Human contact is one of the most important contributions one can make.

I very much wanted to get involved in what she was doing. My problem is being in a small city with crap transportation. I can't drive because of eye surgery gone wrong. I have difficult walking distances because of respiratory problems. So I could take a taxi to the centre and back, at $20 return fare even for that relatively short distance, at the rates that prevail here. Seemed kind of counter-productive. I bought the famous e-bike, and the battery immediately went dead and wouldn't charge, and so the thing became one more problem to deal with instead of a solution to a problem, and stayed in the shed.

But now I have just bought - and everybody shut up, I have balance problems because of the lack of depth perception - an "adult trike", used, from my favourite buy-and-sell site (those boogers cost a fortune new and are hard to find used), with giant carry baskets, so I can hit the grocery store and the hardware store a mile or so away when the urge strikes -- it's the practical transportation element, being able to get to sources and get what's needed, that's the issue, not looking hip. And my old Peugeot racer wouldn't have been any use for that.

So I'm going to start using it once a week or so, to pick up whatever's on special at the discount store nearby and drop in for lunch and a game of cards this summer.

Meanwhile, you keep letting the young couple know that they matter to somebody. That's the big deal.

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Response to Boadicea (Reply #11)

Sun Apr 23, 2017, 11:04 AM

17. Our church along with three others

 

Houses homeless families in a rotation. Our current family of five become homeless after a recent transfer to Houston. They got hit with mother's cancer diagnoses and the fathers layoff simultaneously. My daughters hosted dinner & game night with the kids last week. Most families need 6-12 weeks to get housing and work.

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Response to TexMex (Reply #17)

Tue Apr 25, 2017, 01:37 PM

21. That's great that y'all do that.

We don't have the resources, but we have a ton of food. A good thing that came out of me meeting this couple is that I got introduced to a homeless advocate here in Huntsville. They have a lot more resources than we do, and he has suggested a partnership of sorts. He can really help us in the pantry. It's a blessing for us as we are in a rural area and are totally self funded. Every little bit helps.

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Response to Boadicea (Reply #21)

Wed Apr 26, 2017, 07:49 PM

23. Our church takes a hands on approach to a life of service.

 

My wife is the Meals on Wheels coordinator and they serve 20-30 clients daily. We are lucky, our Church was shrinking when we joined 17 years ago, but through leadership from our pastor, we've had lots of growth and a more involved congregation over the years.

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sun Apr 23, 2017, 03:25 AM

15. Over the four day Easter weekend

I flew an attractive young Slovak blonde to London, put her up in my Central London flat, took her to dinner at three of London's finest restaurants, went to a wonderful performance of An American in Paris, and bought her a expensive new dress in Regent Street.

All doing my bit for the women of Slovakia.

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Response to Cold Warrior (Reply #15)

Tue Apr 25, 2017, 01:18 PM

20. Outstanding.

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Response to Carlos W Bush (Reply #20)

Tue Apr 25, 2017, 02:00 PM

22. I know. Helping young, hot Slovak women

one at a time in my tireless crusade to make the world better for women.

Some women's rights organisation should give me a grant so that I could do more (as it were).

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sun Apr 23, 2017, 07:07 AM

16. Working hard and paying taxes so the government can distribute as it sees fit.

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Sun Apr 23, 2017, 11:39 AM

18. Money is still tight but we do support two groups

One is a group that smuggles USB drives loaded with movies and portable copies of Wikipedia into North Korea. I'd like to think we are in some small way contributing toward their eventual freedom.

Secondly we are members of the Yellowstone Foundation and Smithsonian Institution.I think preservation of our natural wonders and human history are extremely important.

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Response to i verglas (Original post)

Tue Apr 25, 2017, 01:09 PM

19. Tell us about your adventures in empowering women and girls to resist abuse!

Continuing to offer training and programs to help abused and disadvanteged people get training and licensing to arm themselves. As part of this we offer classes, and a program to get low cost firearms and secure storage for those firearms.

We offer a non partisan and non political learning atmosphere, and have equal male and female cadre of all races and creeds.

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