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Mon Apr 24, 2017, 04:43 PM

Family's Plantation - Chickasaw Co, Mississippi

NOTE: Click on link and JPEG photo will open in new tab on browser.

Dendy's Cotton and Saw Mill on family's plantation:

http://digital.library.msstate.edu/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=charm&CISOPTR=7889&action=2&DMSCALE=75&DMWIDTH=512&DMHEIGHT=465&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=&DMROTATE=0

Great, Great Grandfather on plantation after the Civil War:

http://digital.library.msstate.edu/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=charm&CISOPTR=7894&action=2&DMSCALE=90&DMWIDTH=512&DMHEIGHT=462&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=&DMROTATE=0

Repository Manuscripts Division, Special Collections Department, Mississippi State University Libraries.
Location of Original XXXXXX (James R.) Family Papers. Manuscripts Division. Special Collections Department. Mississippi State University Libraries.
Related materials A digitization project sponsored by the Consortium for the History of Agricultural and Rural Mississippi (Charm).

I have done this b/c I have talked about stories I was told in 70's and later.

The sons moved off the place b/c they couldn't make a profit w/out their slaves.

Also, to my current knowledge, we were not 'confederates', at least not soldiers. I need to research more ... in the end I will have a narrative to tell.

Then there's the story of an even older great grandmother was buried in plot along Mississppi river. They went to relocate grave b/c of rising river water and learned her corpse had turned into limestone b/c of minerals downriver. Barely weighed 100 lbs in life, she weighed round 800 lbs in death.

- R.F.

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Reply Family's Plantation - Chickasaw Co, Mississippi (Original post)
RATFINK_5.0 Apr 2017 OP
Argentina Apr 2017 #1
RATFINK_5.0 Apr 2017 #2
Boadicea Apr 2017 #3
RATFINK_5.0 Apr 2017 #6
Boadicea Apr 2017 #8
His Daughter Apr 2017 #4
RATFINK_5.0 Apr 2017 #5
His Daughter Apr 2017 #9
Shredded Hedly Apr 2017 #7

Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Original post)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 05:02 PM

1. Very interesting OP. Recommended.

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Response to Argentina (Reply #1)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 05:30 PM

2. Thanks. Crossed out family name w/ XXXX's b/c it's our family's name.

It's best in this day and age to remain anonymous.

What's scary is photo looks just like grandad did, which looks like dad, which looks like me. It's like looking at a ghost in the mirror. S p o o k y.

There are other photos in the collection, including grandad as a child.

What's more, is now I need to research slave records to know more about our heritage.

We didn't always like blacks in the past ... but sons rebel. My grandfather did w/ his dad ... & here we are.

I have to leave but will check-in in a few hours.


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Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Original post)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 05:35 PM

3. I love old pictures.

Studying the south is a little bit of a hobby I stumbled upon while looking for my paternal grandmother (still haven't found her and she would be in her 80s.) Anyway, I found a census of my county prior and after the Civil War. Lots of pepole owned slaves in my area. There were a few that had hundreds, but most others had 1-3. It was very eye opening to say the least. My family never owned slaves that I can find. My nanny and pops families were dirt poor share croppers. They have a few pictures from that time and they are similar to yours. Thanks for posting.

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Response to Boadicea (Reply #3)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 07:49 PM

6. Do you know what state ? Sounds lot like Mississippi, IMHO.

Lot's of sharecroppin' going on after War. Best of all you could get both blacks & poor whites to work for you ... then everyone's getting what they need from the company store !

Let us know more when you do.


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Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Reply #6)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 08:45 PM

8. Alabama and Mississippi

My maternal grandma was from northern MS and my pops family was from NW Alabama around Russellville. Several generations of sharecroppers. I don't know much before the 1870s. They were always poor....they started in the Appalachians and then moved south for some reason. We're white and indian.

My bio dad's family is the one I'm really working on as I never knew them. I have names and stuff, but everyone is dead, so it's hard. I do know that they were from Chicago via county cork in ireland, and from germany. They all came to the US around 1880. Big catholics and worked in the trades to help build several of the dioceses in chicago. Genealogy research is fun.

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Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Original post)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 07:07 PM

4. Dad's family was from Alabama

Still have some relations there. My grandfather joined the army and never went back. Dad spent some time there, I have been there a few times, but not since I graduated from college.

The stories dad heard were mostly about the 60s. Family members in the Deacons for Defense and other lore. No pictures that I know of.

When hubby finally retires, one of my goals is to go back and make some connections. Sister is in contact with cousins there. Hoping to get some idea of family history.

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Response to His Daughter (Reply #4)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 07:37 PM

5. Never knew about Deacons for Defense. Interesting.

Do an image search on Google and see what you get.

Among the males on that side of the family, tempers were always big to the point it could wreck families, etc. I struggle w/ it to this day, but things are getting better.

That side of the family was never discussed. No one is proud of it. I only knew from old stories and research my grandmother had done. She gave us all 100 pgs + of geneology and a small book that had the places. Only there haveI seen pics of the plantation house ... but this is now 20 yrs hence.

I recommend doing what you said someday soon. Be careful though, in the research there are many rabbit-holes, so be patient & prepared.

Good-Luck !

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Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Reply #5)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 10:09 PM

9. My sister is in the greater DC area, and is in regular casual contact

She also has been building up the genealogy side of things. She and the cousins are trying to get a family reunion thing going. More of an interested party that a actively involved. My late parents were the only ones who moved west. Most of them are still in the southeast.

It has been interesting to see how much the military has been involved in uplifting the extended family, not just us. About half the men have in the service, most of the last two generations as officers. Also lots of mixed race marriages as well. It should be fun. They are putting together pics and bios for later this year.

The stories about the Deacons are interesting. Lots of people have no clue they even existed. There is some family lore about it. Dad used to say it sounded a lot like the French in Indochina vs the Viet Cong.

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Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Original post)

Mon Apr 24, 2017, 07:55 PM

7. Very interesting family history RF

We used to have a family plantation before the war but then a town sprang up around it.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onley,_Virginia


http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Wise_Henry_A_1806-1876#start_entry

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