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Thu Oct 12, 2017, 10:59 AM

A Portuguese explorer discovered Rio in the 1500s and, thinking the bay was fed by a river, named...

... the location "River of January." Now, in Spanish the word "de" means "of" but in Portuguese the word "do" means "of."

Rio De Janeiro, discovered by a Portuguese explorer, is in Brazil, where the language spoken is Portuguese, so WHY isn't the city, once the capital city of Brazil, named Rio Do Janeiro? I've looked and have not found...

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Reply A Portuguese explorer discovered Rio in the 1500s and, thinking the bay was fed by a river, named... (Original post)
Gamle-ged Oct 12 OP
Currentsitguy Oct 12 #1
Gamle-ged Oct 12 #2
TendiesForBreakfast Oct 12 #3
Gamle-ged Oct 12 #4

Response to Gamle-ged (Original post)

Thu Oct 12, 2017, 11:08 AM

1. Just a speculative guess

Perhaps the map makers were Spanish?

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 12, 2017, 12:40 PM

2. I looked at a recent map of the Rio area and found the articles "de, da, and do." I may have had...

... the wrong idea, as Portuguese "do" CAN mean: from, of, than, to, from the, of the."

In one of the Jason Bourne movies I noted a fake passport from Brazil with the name Gilberto do Pinto and assumed "do" meant "of," but it can also mean "from."

I took Spanish in HS, lived in Italy for two years ("di" in Italian is "of" but I now know that "di" CAN also mean "about, and, at, by, for, from, in, of, on, some, than, to, with) and I believe I'll chuck the whole thing at this point...


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Response to Gamle-ged (Original post)

Thu Oct 12, 2017, 05:36 PM

3. "de" is a preposition in Portuguese as well.

"do" and "da" as prepositions come from contracting the preposition "de" with either a masculine ("o") or feminine ("a") definite article.

De o livro = do livro (from the book)
De a casa = da casa (from the house)

Because January doesn't have a definite article before it, it simply remains "de". "Rio do Janeiro" wouldn't be correct because it would improperly translate to "River of the January".

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Response to TendiesForBreakfast (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 12, 2017, 05:52 PM

4. Obrigado!...

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