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Mon Dec 2, 2019, 08:30 AM

Does having a degree in engineering and working in the field

Last edited Mon Dec 2, 2019, 09:01 AM - Edit history (1)

Make you an engineer or climate scientist?
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Engineer
6 (100%)
Climate scientist.
0 (0%)
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13 replies, 190 views

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Arrow 13 replies Author Time Post
Reply Does having a degree in engineering and working in the field (Original post)
SatansSon666 Dec 2 OP
foia Dec 2 #1
SatansSon666 Dec 2 #2
foia Dec 2 #3
SatansSon666 Dec 2 #4
DavesNotHere Dec 2 #6
foia Dec 2 #8
DavesNotHere Dec 2 #9
foia Dec 2 #10
DavesNotHere Dec 2 #11
Da Mannn Dec 2 #5
rampartb Dec 2 #7
His Daughter Dec 2 #12
Lowrider1984 Dec 3 #13

Response to SatansSon666 (Original post)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 08:43 AM

1. It depends upon whether or not you agree with the hoaxers

Bill Nye''s mechanical engineering degree and kiddie show make him a top climate scientist.

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Response to foia (Reply #1)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 08:49 AM

2. Just answer the poll.

Who said anything about bill nye or mechanical engineering?

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Response to SatansSon666 (Original post)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 08:54 AM

3. Getting a degree does not make one an engineer

You have to pass a professional exam (FE or EIT) and then get job a job doing actual engineering work to be an engineer.

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Response to foia (Reply #3)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 08:58 AM

4. OK. Fair enough.

I'll rephrase.
I'd imagine the same criteria for being a climate scientist then.
Right?

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Response to foia (Reply #3)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 09:53 AM

6. It depends on the type of engineer.

I know many mechanical, chemical and software engineers who have worked in the field for decades and never taken the exam. It depends on the sort of work one does whether it’s required or not.

Having said that, being any kind of engineer doesn’t make anyone a climate expert (any more than having a theology degree would).

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Response to DavesNotHere (Reply #6)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 10:57 AM

8. A software engineer is not really the same as a physical sciences engineer

I know that when I got my civil degree that if I wanted an engineering job that I've have to take the EIT exam. (But I didn't because I got an MBA and went into IT consulting.)

And civil engineers do study climate in many respects in the "air & water" discipline of it to understand the hydrologic cycle in order to deal with rain runoff for construction of buildings, highways, damns, levies, etc.... among other things.

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Response to foia (Reply #8)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 11:02 AM

9. Yes, this sort of thing seems largely for engineers that work

On large public projects or construction projects. Civil engineers, environmental engineers, etc tend to need these certifications. A large majority of engineering that doesn’t deal in this sort of thing does not need them at all.

In either case, neither the education or the certification makes one a climate expert.

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Response to DavesNotHere (Reply #9)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 11:15 AM

10. My concentration was in structural

And it was a pretty standard requirement in that arena, probably because when buildings fall down people can die.

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Response to foia (Reply #10)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 11:30 AM

11. Yes, you wouldnt want a bridge designed or built by someone

Without verifying their credentials either. I’m a software engineer, but have worked with mechanical and electrical engineers for years. Since we are working with smaller devices, these certification requirements have never been an issue.

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Response to SatansSon666 (Original post)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 09:29 AM

5. If you buy into the whole climate hoax, you are neither one.

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Response to SatansSon666 (Original post)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 10:41 AM

7. either, both

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Response to SatansSon666 (Original post)

Mon Dec 2, 2019, 11:34 AM

12. I prefer to look at it as STEM/non-STEM

It avoids things like is an MD a scientist and are where does computer science/engineering/software belong. Some of it is personal since my undergrad is in Comp Sci, and I went to med school.

To be successful in STEM ones needs to be able to think rationally, understand action-reaction, and be able to think critically. Not so much for arts and parties majors.

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Response to SatansSon666 (Original post)

Tue Dec 3, 2019, 12:56 PM

13. Well, I'm BOTH!

Got my Engineering degree in 1972.
Began working as an engineer in 1973.
Corporate employer asked me in 1980 if I was interested in an environmental science degree, on them, during working hours, and I agreed.
Graduated in 1985, and established company's Environmental Department.
Worked in both departments until I retired in 2016.

By the way, in the early 1980s, we were being taught to prepare for the coming Ice Age.
Times change.

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