Culturesolstice

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:01 PM

Happy Winter Solstice



Defined simply as the day of longest daylight and shortest night, winter solstice is an astronomical event when the Sun is directly overhead of the Tropic of Capricorn in the Southern Hemisphere. The December solstice occurs when the Sun reaches its most southerly declination of -23.5 degrees. In other words, it is a day when the North Pole is tilted the farthest – 23.5 degrees – away from the Sun.

Celebrations of the concept of the rebirth of the Sun can been found throughout the history. Egyptians, for instance, celebrated the return of Ra, the Sun god, on a daily basis. A similar festival marked by ancient Greeks was known as 'Lenaea'. The holiday was celebrated as 'Yule' by Scandinavia's Norsemen – where families would light Yule logs and eat until they burn out.

People from German backgrounds also celebrated the winter festival honoring the Pagan god Odin, who was believed to have the ability to fly through the night sky on a magical flying horse and announce who would be blessed or cursed in the year to come.

Winter Solstice And Christmas

The Winter Solstice shares a very subtle relationship with the festivities surrounding Christmas. In fact, the Bible has no exact date of the Christ's birth and it was only in the fourth century that the church decided Jesus Christ's birthday should be celebrated.

There is a general consensus that due to lack of precision on a date, Pope Julies I chose 25 December as the birthday of Christ in an attempt to replace the Roman Saturnalia with the Christian holiday.

More: http://www.ibtimes.co.in/winter-solstice-2014-interesting-facts-about-longest-night-pagan-celebration-yule-617836

10 replies, 1912 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 10 replies Author Time Post
Reply Happy Winter Solstice (Original post)
Attila Gorilla Dec 2014 OP
WritelyWrong Dec 2014 #1
USNRET1988 Dec 2014 #2
smokingman Dec 2014 #3
Commander Emily Dec 2014 #4
Gamle-ged Dec 2014 #7
Argentina Dec 2014 #5
Thorson Dec 2014 #6
Gamle-ged Dec 2014 #8
Attila Gorilla Dec 2014 #9
Gamle-ged Dec 2014 #10

Response to Attila Gorilla (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:04 PM

1. Light Up the Yule Log

and Blessed Be.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Attila Gorilla (Original post)


Response to Attila Gorilla (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:45 PM

3. From my favorite Australian witch.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Attila Gorilla (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 07:06 PM

4. I think for us...

in the N. hemisphere, it's the shortest day and
longest night.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Commander Emily (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 11:39 PM

7. Quite right...

In 2014, the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere will begin on Dec. 21 at 6:03 p.m. EST. To calculate the turning point in your time zone, click here.

Officially the first day of winter, the winter solstice occurs when the North Pole is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun. This is the longest night of the year, meaning that despite the cold winter, the days get progressively longer after the winter solstice until the summer solstice in 2015.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Attila Gorilla (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 09:38 PM

5. Today would have been my dad's 88th birthday if he were still alive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Attila Gorilla (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 09:53 PM

6. I celebrate Winter Solstice, Christmas and the New Year.

I do wish some of these special days were spread more apart, they are bunched up together and then there is nothing special the rest of the winter.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Attila Gorilla (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 11:51 PM

8. Parenthetically, take a trip to the southern polar region now, and see the Sun go around and around,

never setting. Zip up north and you won't see the sun at all until sometime in February...

http://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/greenland/thule-air-base

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #8)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 01:08 AM

9. I'd like to see that.

It would be an amazing site.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Attila Gorilla (Reply #9)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 01:45 AM

10. It is. For close to three months or so in Summer, at a pole, or within a few hundred mile of one...

... the Sun travels all around the horizon over 24 hrs, higher in the East, lower in the West, but never diving below the horizon line. Up to that point, the days grow longer and longer, and after the three months the days begin to shorten throughout the year until, for three months of Winter, the Sun never rises above the horizon. For a few weeks you get some light at "dawn" but then less and less until it's always dark. People get to the point where they get high up on a mountain to see the first traces of light in early February or so.

The effect varies, of course, depending on your latitude. I was about 800 miles north of the Arctic Circle, 900 miles from the North Pole...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Culturesolstice