Sportssportsdavekingmannymetshalloffamehomeruns

Mon Feb 23, 2015, 05:29 PM

Dave Kong Kingman then vs. today The Fall of the Home Run King

Note-it is my firm belief that Dave Kingman should be in the baseball hall of fame. He won't.
But he should be. Those that saw him....
and this new article is spot-on
Glad there is someone young and unbiased out there who agrees

http://www.sportsonearth.com/article/110126396/home-runs-baseball-dave-kingman-strikeout-three-true-outcome
The Fall of the Home Run King

Did you know that Dave Kingman has a fan website? He does! It takes you through his upbringing (1948-63, The Early Years), his time with the Alaska Goldpanners, even the 10 games he played for the California Angels. The site is not what we in the biz might call "optimized to enhance the user experience." It appears to have been designed on a Commodore Amiga 500 -- there are flashing doo-wads everywhere, like an old MySpace page - and the host of the site, who makes it clear that his site has the "expressed oral consent of Dave Kingman," crows that it has reached 8,150 hits in two years. (That two-year anniversary date: Oct. 28, 1998.) But don't worry, an update is coming. The most recent post on the site affirms that "Keep checking back as the site will soon undergo some major changes!" That post went up Oct. 18, 2005.
It's still a blast to click around the site. Dave Kingman is one of those baseball players spoken of in whispers, a certain sort of awe; he is a slugger from another time, another planet all together. He was the favorite player growing up of Jim Thome and Mark McGwire, and this Mets fan site is full of stories from people who speak of him as if he were a Martian who visited earth for a few years, wowed everyone and then flew off to his home planet. This was a man whose power was so prodigious that he was given the nickname "King Kong." THIS GUY. What must the world of baseball have been like when Dave Kingman was known as a primal, strapping force? He was 6-foot-6, 210 pounds, which is big … but that's 100 pounds less than a starting pitcher for the Yankees. He wasn't that big.

Dave Kingman was known for two things: Hitting massive home runs and striking out all the time. This made him a folk hero, but also incredibly polarizing -- and it sort of made sure that no one would ever take him all that seriously. During the years of Kingman's career, 1971-86, if you hit a ton of home runs but put together a low batting average, this was a cause for mockery. In 1979, Kingman hit 48 homers, which put him among the top 10 home run-hitting seasons of all time, and had a league-leading .956 OPS (which would have been tops in the National League last year), but all anyone wanted to talk about was how he struck out a Majors-leading 131 times. (He somehow only finished 11th in NL MVP Award voting that year.) In 1982, he led the league with 37 home runs, but that was noted less than the fact that he had a lower batting average (.204) than the man who won the NL Cy Young Award (Steve Carlton). In 1976, he had 30 home runs at the All-Star break and might have challenged Roger Maris' record if he hadn't been injured in the second half; imagine how baseball history would be different if freaking Dave Kingman ending up being the all-time single-season home run leader.

The point is this: During an age when there weren't many home runs hit, Kingman could hit them, but nobody cared because he struck out so often. In his final season, the one in which baseball collectively agreed that he just struck out too much to continue to play, Kingman K'd 126 times.

That wouldn't have even gotten him in the top 40 in strikeouts last season.

(more at link showing current players and how Dave Kingman's stats are impressive-
more home runs
less strike outs than today's thought of stars)...


a NY Met photo of Dave

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Reply Dave Kong Kingman then vs. today The Fall of the Home Run King (Original post)
graham4anything4HC45 Feb 2015 OP
GoodCraic Feb 2015 #1
graham4anything4HC45 Feb 2015 #2
GoodCraic Feb 2015 #3
graham4anything4HC45 Feb 2015 #4
GoodCraic Feb 2015 #6
Bronxbomber Feb 2015 #8
graham4anything4HC45 Feb 2015 #9
Louie Feb 2015 #5
Bronxbomber Feb 2015 #7
graham4anything4HC45 Mar 2017 #10
TheyLostTheirForums Mar 2017 #11

Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Original post)

Mon Feb 23, 2015, 05:57 PM

1. He could certainly hit them long

and do it pretty frequently. However he was a one trick pony and unless he hit the magical 500 homers he was never getting into the HOF. He only hit 100 or more RBI's twice in his career which tells me many of his homers were solo shots and not as meaningful. Lastly since he did that idiotic, sexist "prank" by sending a rat to the female sports writer you know the sports writers were never going to vote him in.

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Response to GoodCraic (Reply #1)

Mon Feb 23, 2015, 06:30 PM

2. His last season he was free agent in a year no free agent was re-signed. He hit 35 homers

Never before in history has someone hit that many and not been picked by some team, even as DH
(except for someone who retired). He wanted to play

He had 442.
Had he got new contracts, easily in 2 years, maybe 3, he would have gotten the magic 500.

But at that time, no player with 400 or more had not gotten into the Hall.

and yes, he was hated by the press and he hated them.But that should not have prevented him from at least
getting some more chances on the hall ballot, he only was on one year. His stats warrented more.
He should be reconsidered. Especially as (and one obviously can tell,look how skinny he was for his size),
he was clean and used no steroids or other additives.)

He did what they paid him to do. Not one bit more, but he did what he was paid to do.

imho (and I know it will never happen, unless they make some new old timer rules).

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Reply #2)

Mon Feb 23, 2015, 07:53 PM

3. i think it speaks volumes

That he never got a contract. Either no one felt he could help win games or he was so bad in the clubhouse he wasn't worth it. Also I believe to make it to the HOF one must be a dominant for a significant period and I never felt he was dominant.

I think Albert Belle was a far better player than Kingman and he'll never get in because he was such a jerk.

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Response to GoodCraic (Reply #3)

Mon Feb 23, 2015, 08:05 PM

4. no, there was a reason that season-

the owners all conspired to not sign any free agent

It went to court and was decided later on in the player's favorites, but by that time it was too late for Kingman, too much time had passed.

But the owners were trying to break the players union that year, and break the skyhigh salaries the owners themselves were responsible for, and wanted the players to not have free agency (which again, was illegal).

So it wasn't due to ability. It was the illegal conspiracy to stop free agency

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Reply #4)

Mon Feb 23, 2015, 08:51 PM

6. yeah i remember that now.

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 25, 2015, 01:39 AM

8. Christ, I remember that. It cost the Yanks a chance to sign Jack Morris in his prime.

King George would have undoubtedly signed Morris if he wasn't busy colluding with the other owners that off season. He ended up going back to the Tigers where he would continue to haunt the Yanks. This was back when the Yankee lineup featured Rickey Henderson, Mattingly, Winfield, and Jack Clark in or close to their respective primes. What they lacked was starting pitching, and Morris was just about the best there was at that time. The winningest pitcher in the 1980s, in fact. Oh well....

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Response to Bronxbomber (Reply #8)

Wed Feb 25, 2015, 07:23 AM

9. yup. well, as a Met fan, I can truly say-

I wish Steinbrenner owned the Mets. At least he wanted to win.
After Joan Payson was no longer the Mets owner, they became their old second tier self.

The day the Mets got rid of Seaver and Kingman and a few others was the end.
Seaver I thought should have gone on to be the GM/Manager of the Mets.
But for whatever reason, they did not want to remember the 1969 Mets.
(Could it be their new owners were Orioles at heart and never forgave the Mets for 1969?) LOL

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Original post)

Mon Feb 23, 2015, 08:22 PM

5. I actually liked Kong.

And as a teenager, I saw one of the ten games he played for the Angels.

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Original post)

Tue Feb 24, 2015, 07:22 PM

7. K&A. Great article. Thanks for posting this.

Of course, growing up in NYC in the late-70's/early-80's, I have plenty of vivid memories of Kong. His sheer strength was nothing short of legendary. I love how the article describes the awed recollections of Met fans today. His power did seem otherworldly at the times. Every now and again, he'd hit a ball out of Shea altogether that would end up smashing a windshield in the parking lot 500+ ft away. Just amazing!

Even though he's remembered in NY primarily as a Met, the Yanks (my team, in case you couldn't guess ) briefly had him towards the end of the 1977 season. Unfortunately, the Yanks acquired him after Sept 1st, so he wasn't eligible to make their playoff roster that year. As good as that Yankee lineup was, it was positively frightening with Kingman in there batting between Reggie and Nettles.Too bad they didn't keep him.

Anywho, great stuff!

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Original post)

Thu Mar 9, 2017, 03:52 AM

10. Two years later, I still believe Dave Kingman should be in the Hall of Fame

Even at 68, bet he could still hit 50 home runs a year

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Reply #10)

Thu Mar 9, 2017, 01:13 PM

11. Although I liked watching him during the Met years

the guy struck out like 800 million times, and was a terrible fielder. No HOF

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