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Fri May 23, 2014, 12:24 PM

OPS explained

While I wasn't looking the SABRmetricians staged some kind of coup. All sorts of puzzling new stats have been introduced. Faced with an unexpected learning curve, I'm doing my homework. From Wikipedia:

The basic equation is

OPS = OBP + SLG ,

where OBP is on-base percentage and SLG is slugging average. These averages are defined

SLG = frac{TB} {AB}

and

OBP = frac{H+BB+HBP} {AB+BB+SF+HBP}

where:
H = Hits
BB = Base on balls
HBP = Times hit by pitch
AB = At bats
SF = Sacrifice flies
TB = Total bases

In one equation, OPS can be represented as:

OPS = frac{AB*(H+BB+HBP)+TB*(AB+BB+SF+HBP)}{AB*(AB+BB+SF+HBP)}

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Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply OPS explained (Original post)
orson May 2014 OP
padiae May 2014 #1
Magyar May 2014 #2
TheRalphWiggum May 2014 #3
orson May 2014 #4
TheRalphWiggum May 2014 #5
Zutak May 2014 #6
orson May 2014 #7
Zutak May 2014 #8
graham4anything4HC45 May 2014 #9
Zutak May 2014 #10
graham4anything4HC45 May 2014 #11

Response to orson (Original post)

Fri May 23, 2014, 03:34 PM

1. Bill Johnson

Yep. Years ago, I put that formula into a spreadsheet containing all 25,000 players from 1880 on and then played a statistical game using this formula divided by (game)salary and came up with some good teams. The site was whatifsports and you can download all of the stats from ALL players in baseball history from there. then put these formula into your spreadsheet and pick your teams.

Also, taking a variation of this formula, you can determine average runs produced and base your picks on that as well.

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Response to orson (Original post)

Sun May 25, 2014, 06:44 PM

2. Man, you're giving me a headache.

And I'm a big baseball fan.. minor league, mostly.

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Response to orson (Original post)

Mon May 26, 2014, 06:15 PM

3. Shall we start talking about all the other advanced terms?

WAR, VORP, DIPS, BABIP, FIERA. There is certainly some validity to all of these things. And hey, you have to be both a baseball and math wonk as I am to appreciate these advanced stats. But they still make my head spin from time to time.

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Response to TheRalphWiggum (Reply #3)

Mon May 26, 2014, 06:23 PM

4. Bloggers are great ones for tossing these around

I think it's like writers who drop in a French phrase every so often, just to prove they're smarter than I am.

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Response to orson (Reply #4)

Mon May 26, 2014, 06:44 PM

5. True that n/t

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Response to orson (Original post)

Tue May 27, 2014, 12:19 AM

6. Interesting stat, but...

the double-counting of singles is not, to me, obviously a good thing here.

This stat favors a HR hitter who is walked a lot, and to be a distinctive stat I would try to isolate that more by just doing walk % + slugging %. I think would be a fine stat for power hitters.

Power hitter walks are not a detriment the way some casual fans think. (Preventing the guy from hitting a HR) But a replacement level player with a man at second is likelier to drive in a run (or rather, that runner is likelier to eventually score) than Babe Ruth with a man on first, and even more so with a man on versus bases empty. (I know you know that, but offered for other readers.)

So walking Babe Ruth ahead of Joe Nobody elevates Joe Nobody to something more dangerous than Babe Ruth was in the bases empty at bat he was just walked on. So I love a stat for high OBP power hitters.

But counting singles twice favors players who hit singles, specifically. Hence my objection. Not much point in an impatient .380 singles hitter being a contender for the walks n' slugging stat.

But having said that... we are talking about a stat for RBI men, and a single has more value than a walk in that way... But nobody thinks a single is twice as valuable as a walk on average.

How about ((OBP + SLG) - (BA))? Hmmm... That counts a single as 1.5 times a walk, which seems reasonable.

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Response to Zutak (Reply #6)

Tue May 27, 2014, 12:06 PM

7. It does seem that managers are leaning more on these kind of stats

But when Bill James started all this back in the 70's, I think he was focused more on finding hidden gems; high value players who weren't recognized as such, rather than parsing game situations. The best managers, guys like Stengel, Weaver and La Russa, probably make calculations like this all the time, without resorting to math. Weaver's favorite play was the 3-run homer, but of course that depends on 2 other guys getting on base, maybe by a walk and a single.

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Response to orson (Reply #7)

Tue May 27, 2014, 12:28 PM

8. Yes, the 3-run homer is an implicit endorsment of OBP

And the fact that walks are an offensive play made by individual hitters as much as an error (or stratagem) made by individual pitchers is better understood than back in the day, but probably not yet well enough appreciated by fans. (And since the walk is not very entertaining, understandably so)

There were (and perhaps still are) people who thought Ted Williams would have been a better hitter if he hadn't been obsessed with never swinging at balls.

It's odd, but many fans would trade 100 times on base for 5 homers.

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Response to orson (Original post)

Wed May 28, 2014, 09:59 AM

9. DAVE KINGMAN. Shows that Stats do not show everything.

Stats do not do justice to the one person who was perhaps the most divisive player ever, while at the same time, the single most exciting batter ever, for each time he came up, one never knew how high, or how far, his homeruns would go. Simply the best IMHO who is not in the hall.

And stats did not either way knock him off the hall of fame ballot.
His divisiveness and his hatred of and by writers to him.

and stats do not show how all free agents the last year he played were blacklisted and not signed, and never before in history did someone with 35 homers not get signed to another team.

So stats do not show all

(note-Dave Kingman should be in the Hall of Fame, and he played clean.Even if the stats don't say.)

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Response to graham4anything4HC45 (Reply #9)

Wed May 28, 2014, 11:28 AM

10. Long HRs count the same as shorter HRs

And Kingman does not have Hall of Fame stats. The fact that he was a jerk is not significant to his exclusion from the Hall because he wouldn't make it even if he wasn't a jerk.

He was a poor fielder with high strikeouts and low on base percentage who some fans liked because he hit unusually long home runs that didn't help his team any more than any other home runs, but that were entertaining.

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Response to Zutak (Reply #10)

Wed May 28, 2014, 12:56 PM

11. disagree

stats show no one with his # of home runs is not in the hall (at the time he was first eligible)

stats show no one with 35 was not given a contract by another team the next year but him (at that time, and he was clean, so even to today nobody with his numbers would not have played more

two more seasons and 500.
no other player (except those dirty players who used banned substances) has been denied with 500.

hall of fame.

(and he got almost zero votes the first year, knocking him off altogether with no second year

Surely anyother player would have remained on the ballot for 15 years not just one. And had a chance with an oldies committee later on

where the rules are different.

hall of fame, stats don't tell the whole story

(BTW-where is Gil Hodges?)

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