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Sat Feb 4, 2017, 06:08 PM

Do you think that CTE

will eventually be the end of football?

11 replies, 366 views

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Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply Do you think that CTE (Original post)
Aldar Feb 2017 OP
JaimeBondoJr Feb 2017 #1
batcat Feb 2017 #2
Aldar Feb 2017 #4
batcat Feb 2017 #5
metroins Feb 2017 #3
His Daughter Feb 2017 #6
TheyLostTheirForums Feb 2017 #7
TheyLostTheirForums Feb 2017 #8
TheyLostTheirForums Feb 2017 #9
Aldar Feb 2017 #10
JJ667 Feb 2017 #11

Response to Aldar (Original post)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 06:23 PM

1. Nnnnnnope.

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Response to Aldar (Original post)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 06:26 PM

2. It might help if you explained CTE stands for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. ...

What Is CTE?

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Explained

The condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) was formerly believed to exist primarily among boxers, and was referred to as dementia pugilistica. It is a progressive degenerative disease which afflicts the brain of people who have suffered repeated concussions and traumatic brain injuries, such as athletes who take part in contact sports, members of the military and others. The term encephalopathy derives from Ancient Greek en- "in," kephale "head," and patheia "suffering." Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a condition of brain damage which persists over a period of years or decades and which is the result of traumatic impacts to the cranium.
http://www.protectthebrain.org/Brain-Injury-Research/What-is-CTE-.aspx


In my opinion it is possible that lawsuits from injured athletes might result in full contact football being dropped at the high school level, and possibly at the college level. If so the sport would be in danger of dying out.

Perhaps better helmet technology might prevent injury.

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Response to batcat (Reply #2)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 06:31 PM

4. I think it will hurt football.

Both college and the NFL rely upon a player "pipeline" so to speak. Kids often start with Pop Warner, than junior high and high school. More and more parents are not allowing their kids to play. I think the pipeline will dry up. It will take time but football may well be doomed.

CTE is bad shit. There is tons of data out there about it and I encourage football fans to learn more.

Many ex players today are in a bad way because of it. Jr Seau among other committed suicide do to CTE.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_traumatic_encephalopathy

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Response to Aldar (Reply #4)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 07:08 PM

5. I wonder if going to soft helmets might help. ...


LIZ STINSON DESIGN DATE OF PUBLICATION: 01.13.16.
The Zero1 Flexible Football Helmet May Save Players’ Brains | WIRED

Football is a game of simple physics: One player has a ball, and many other players who do not have the ball want to stop him in his tracks. Sometimes this interaction happens at high speed. Speeds so fast that the parties involved bang into each other with a G force equivalent to a bowling ball being dropped on a head from 8 feet high.

Football is a beautifully violent game, which is the reason Americans simultaneously exalt and fear the sport. It’s the reason people cheer when a cornerback makes the tackle or a linebacker pummels his opponent. It’s also the reason that one out of every three players in the NFL will experience some form of brain trauma during his career. According to an investigation from Frontline, there have been nearly 200 concussions so far this NFL season, and those are just the concussions that were officially reported.

The NFL has a very real head injury problem. And after years of outright denial, the organization has finally begun to acknowledge its culpability through payouts, research grants around traumatic brain injuries, and initiatives like the Head Health Challenge, which gives grants to companies working on advancements in football-related head health. One of those grant recipients was Vicis. Now, the Seattle company has designed a new, flexible helmet called the Zero1 it believes can reduce the chances of a player sustaining a concussion.

***snip***

Vicis’s helmet borrows ideas from the automotive industry, which has used plastic bumpers and crumple zones as protective measures for decades. “It’s a very challenging engineering problem,” Browd says. “Instead of trying to slow a car down over many feet or yards, we’re trying to slow these impacts down over 2.5 inches.” The Zero1, which was designed with the help of Seattle design studio Artefact, revolves around a multilayered system that begins with a flexible outer shell made from a bendable plastic and ends with an inner shell and liner that are meant to provide a more customized fit around the head.
https://www.wired.com/2016/01/the-zero1-flexible-football-helmet-may-save-players-brains/

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Response to Aldar (Original post)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 06:29 PM

3. I liked it better when they got hurt

I also liked end zone dances

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Response to Aldar (Original post)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 08:20 PM

6. It has not ended boxing or MMA

And there is a lot more money in American football

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Response to Aldar (Original post)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 08:59 PM

7. No, drastically change it.

U.S. youth football has already drastically changed the rules.

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Response to Aldar (Original post)

Sat Feb 4, 2017, 09:03 PM

9. btw, this is a good post

Thought about this over the last few years

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Response to TheyLostTheirForums (Reply #9)

Sun Feb 5, 2017, 02:15 PM

10. Thank you

If you haven't already done so, go read about the sad life of former Steeler center Mike Webster after he retired. He played from 1974 to 1990. He ended up homeless before he died at age 50.

Here is one link but there is a LOT of info about him and CTE on the web.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Webster

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Response to Aldar (Original post)

Sun Feb 5, 2017, 04:14 PM

11. It could

There is a good chance kids and high school level football will go away. That won't really hurt pro level play that much. It's not like schools are going to cut back on all athletics and as long as the NFL is where the big money is it will draw the players in at college.

CTE could kill it in the long run if people start avoiding watching football. Particularly if soccer actually takes off in the US at some point. When the ratings go down the money goes down and the star players in college will start looking at other sports. It will end up like boxing, where it's just a niche thing now.

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