Sciencescience

Tue Feb 28, 2017, 02:32 PM

116 year old interview with Nikolai Tesla

The man sounds insane, but considering his knowledge and accomplishments he might have been one of the most sane and connected people to walk the earth.


http://www.ewao.com/a/nikola-teslas-extraordinary-interview-hidden-116-years/

6 replies, 329 views

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Arrow 6 replies Author Time Post
Reply 116 year old interview with Nikolai Tesla (Original post)
Tolk Feb 2017 OP
Grumpy Pickle Feb 2017 #1
Tolk Feb 2017 #2
Slayer Feb 2017 #3
Tolk Mar 2017 #4
Currentsitguy Mar 2017 #5
Tolk Mar 2017 #6

Response to Tolk (Original post)

Tue Feb 28, 2017, 02:45 PM

1. Great interview...thanks for posting.

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Response to Grumpy Pickle (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 28, 2017, 03:45 PM

2. I've always been fascinated by him.

So much of his work "disappeared " after his death. One has to wonder how much different the world would be if that information was out there, or how much different the world would be had he never existed for that matter.

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Response to Tolk (Original post)

Tue Feb 28, 2017, 04:08 PM

3. Will be reading this later, thank you.

 

I have read enough of his words, along with my grandmas accounts to know, we got screwed.

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Response to Slayer (Reply #3)

Wed Mar 1, 2017, 04:30 AM

4. We certainly did

Was an amazing man.

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Response to Tolk (Original post)

Wed Mar 1, 2017, 10:24 AM

5. I'm a bit dubious of it's authenticity

No empty space on this planet, nor in the Universe.. In black holes, what astronomers talk about, are the most powerful sources of energy and life.

The concept of a Black Hole did not exist 116 years ago.

Consider this:

In 1915, Albert Einstein developed his theory of general relativity, having earlier shown that gravity does influence light's motion. Only a few months later, Karl Schwarzschild found a solution to the Einstein field equations, which describes the gravitational field of a point mass and a spherical mass. A few months after Schwarzschild, Johannes Droste, a student of Hendrik Lorentz, independently gave the same solution for the point mass and wrote more extensively about its properties. This solution had a peculiar behaviour at what is now called the Schwarzschild radius, where it became singular, meaning that some of the terms in the Einstein equations became infinite. The nature of this surface was not quite understood at the time. In 1924, Arthur Eddington showed that the singularity disappeared after a change of coordinates (see Eddington–Finkelstein coordinates), although it took until 1933 for Georges Lemaître to realize that this meant the singularity at the Schwarzschild radius was an unphysical coordinate singularity. Arthur Eddington did however comment on the possibility of a star with mass compressed to the Schwarzschild radius in a 1926 book, noting that Einstein's theory allows us to rule out overly large densities for visible stars like Betelgeuse because "a star of 250 million km radius could not possibly have so high a density as the sun. Firstly, the force of gravitation would be so great that light would be unable to escape from it, the rays falling back to the star like a stone to the earth. Secondly, the red shift of the spectral lines would be so great that the spectrum would be shifted out of existence. Thirdly, the mass would produce so much curvature of the space-time metric that space would close up around the star, leaving us outside (i.e., nowhere)."

In 1931, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar calculated, using special relativity, that a non-rotating body of electron-degenerate matter above a certain limiting mass (now called the Chandrasekhar limit at 1.4 M☉) has no stable solutions. His arguments were opposed by many of his contemporaries like Eddington and Lev Landau, who argued that some yet unknown mechanism would stop the collapse. They were partly correct: a white dwarf slightly more massive than the Chandrasekhar limit will collapse into a neutron star, which is itself stable because of the Pauli exclusion principle. But in 1939, Robert Oppenheimer and others predicted that neutron stars above approximately 3 M☉ (the Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff limit) would collapse into black holes for the reasons presented by Chandrasekhar, and concluded that no law of physics was likely to intervene and stop at least some stars from collapsing to black holes.

Oppenheimer and his co-authors interpreted the singularity at the boundary of the Schwarzschild radius as indicating that this was the boundary of a bubble in which time stopped. This is a valid point of view for external observers, but not for infalling observers. Because of this property, the collapsed stars were called "frozen stars", because an outside observer would see the surface of the star frozen in time at the instant where its collapse takes it inside the Schwarzschild radius.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #5)

Sat Mar 4, 2017, 07:50 AM

6. I did think the Enstein comments were a little off

But wasn't real sure on that.
Now that I've reviewed it a little more, the interview can't be from 116 years ago.

I would have to say it was from the late 30s or early 40s shortly before Tesla's death?
Between the Einstein references and the fact that he was living in a hotel would at least point to those dates.
Could be fake or could just be misdated?

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