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Thu Mar 16, 2017, 12:07 PM

Hydrogen fuel cell powered multi-rotor drone for solar panel inspection

Published on Mar 12, 2017
Located in Yinchuan, Ningxia in the northwest of China, Baofeng Solar farm is a gigantic 700MW photovoltaic power station that covers a total 66 million m2 of land area – it is indeed “an ocean of solar panels”. Even the best conventional battery powered multi-rotors can’t cover that much area, and it’s pointless to make it fly back for battery swap. This hydrogen fuel cell powered quadcopter developed by Troowin Power System is capable of traveling over four times the distance, and thus significantly improve the efficiency of solar panel inspection.

Please contact Troowin (info@troowin.com) for similar application. We develop hydrogen fuel cell power systems for applications that require long endurance that traditional technology cannot fulfill.

http://en.troowin.com/



The Hydrogen Revolution has just begun...

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Reply Hydrogen fuel cell powered multi-rotor drone for solar panel inspection (Original post)
Aquila Mar 2017 OP
nolens volens Mar 2017 #1
Aquila Mar 2017 #2
oflguy Mar 2017 #4
Aquila Mar 2017 #5
oflguy Mar 2017 #6
Aquila Mar 2017 #16
nolens volens Mar 2017 #7
oflguy Mar 2017 #8
nolens volens Mar 2017 #10
oflguy Mar 2017 #9
nolens volens Mar 2017 #11
oflguy Mar 2017 #12
nolens volens Mar 2017 #13
oflguy Mar 2017 #14
nolens volens Mar 2017 #15
oflguy Mar 2017 #18
Duke Lacrosse Mar 2017 #17
oflguy Mar 2017 #19
Duke Lacrosse Mar 2017 #20
oflguy Mar 2017 #3

Response to Aquila (Original post)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 12:32 PM

1. The US

should have seriously pursued this after the first fuel crisis of the early 70s...instead of pursuing more ways to become embroiled in the unstable politics of the Middle East.

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Response to nolens volens (Reply #1)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 01:00 PM

2. Instead we had Kissinger and the Petrodollar rammed down our throats

But better late than never. The US won't lead the Hydrogen revolution - or at least it will take time to catch Japan, Korea and Germany- but a nationwide program could happen, and it could be for national security. Imagine never having to worry about Arab Oil, and dollars spent on transportation staying in the US.

Japan deserves a lot of credit for staying with H2 fuel cell R&D wile the US bailed out when Zero took office.



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Response to nolens volens (Reply #1)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 01:14 PM

4. If your local utility company tried to charge you 18 cents per KWH you'd cry like a baby

That's what it costs the Chinese plants to produce solar power

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Response to oflguy (Reply #4)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 01:24 PM

5. Source please. TIA

New Record Low Solar Price in Abu Dhabi – Costs Plunging Faster Than Expected
Posted on September 21, 2016 by Ramez Naam

The price of solar power – in the very sunniest locations in particular – is plunging faster than I expected. I’ve been talking for years now about the exponential decline of solar power prices. I’ve often been called a wide-eyed optimist. Here’s what those projections (based on historical learning rates) look like.



In fact, if anything, my forecasts were too conservative. The solar prices I expected have been smashed by bids in the Middle East and in Latin America. I will need to update the model above in a future post.

The latest record is an incredibly low bid of 2.42 cents / kwh solar electricity in Abu Dhabi. That is an unsubsidized price snip more
http://rameznaam.com/2016/09/21/new-record-low-solar-price-in-abu-dhabi-costs-plunging-faster-than-expected/

If solar electricity costs $.03 cents per kWh, a Kilogram of Hydrogen would cost $1.50 (50 kWh per Kg). A Kg of H2 is about equal to a gallon of gas.

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Response to Aquila (Reply #5)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 01:54 PM

6. Certainly

Unlike your fantasy chart, this is the real cost

"In 2011, the 200 MW Huanghe Hydropower Golmud Solar Park was completed, the world's largest solar farm at the time. There are many other solar farms in Golmud, totaling 570 MW at the end of 2011, with another 500 MW expected in 2012. The Qinghai province, which contains Golmud, leads China in solar installations. Projects completed before September 30, 2012 receive 1.15 yuan ($0.18) per kWh. In May 2011, the National People's Congress (NPC) set 5 GW as an official minimum PV target for 2015, with a longer-term target of 20–30 GW by 2020"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_in_China

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Response to oflguy (Reply #6)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 10:50 AM

16. Fantasy chart?

No. You didn't bother to look at the links?

Projects completed before September 30, 2012 receive 1.15 yuan ($0.18) per kWh

That's the Feed-in-tarriff, and a reason China leads the world in Solar PV. That figure is from a few years ago as well.

Solar power cost down 25% in five months – “There’s no reason why the cost of solar will ever increase again”

On Aug. 11 a bid of US$0.46/W was put forward to build 500MW of solar power in China (a roughly calculated levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) at $0.019/kWh)...https://electrek.co/2016/09/26/solar-power-cost-down-25-in-five-months-theres-no-reason-why-the-cost-of-solar-will-ever-increase-again/


China's Lowest Solar Bid Price Ever: RMB 3.05 per Watt

2016-08-23: China's State Power Investment Corporation (SPIC) held this year's second open tendering procedure for PV projects on August 11th in Beijing. One bidding price set a new record low: RMB 3.05 per watt. This broke the lowest record (RMB 3.19 per watt) set by China General Nuclear Power Group’s (CGN’s) auction for 500 MW of PV project held in the end of July...
http://pv.energytrend.com/news/China_Lowest_Solar_Bid_Price_Ever_RMB_3_05_per_Watt.html

Why China Is Dominating the Solar Industry

Between 2008 and 2013, China's solar-electric panel industry dropped world prices by 80 percent

Between 2008 and 2013, China’s fledgling solar-electric panel industry dropped world prices by 80 percent, a stunning achievement in a fiercely competitive high-tech market. China had leapfrogged from nursing a tiny, rural-oriented solar program in the 1990s to become the globe’s leader in what may soon be the world’s largest renewable energy source https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-china-is-dominating-the-solar-industry/

The US could have done this, but the criminals in DC thought spending trillions (of your money) bombing and invading foreign countries was more important.

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Response to oflguy (Reply #4)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 02:27 PM

7. While

a 50% increase in cost wouldn't thrill me at all, I have seldom cried like a baby at any time during the last 60 years so I suspect as with all things I'd learn to deal with the additional costs as would we all.

We stayed with oil because it's cheap and the people who make the decisions are beholden to the oil companies or to companies that are themselves beholden to big oil.

It's not surprising that the current administration, which has deep ties to that industry, is happy to get the pipelines built again all over the nation and frack the ground as well. It's not surprising that the last administration was happily selling off resources to the Russians...when you follow the money the decision making process of both parties becomes relatively easy to understand for those who choose to understand it.

The cheapest option isn't always the best option.

There was nothing stopping the US from using its research dollars for energy options except a lack of leadership. We got to the moon in less than 10 years because we chose to exercise some initiative...we've never been back and we've never seemed interested since.

We were once the first and foremost place for everything interesting in the world, now we seem something else. A lesser, smaller version of ourselves more interested in short term gratification than long term achievement.

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Response to nolens volens (Reply #7)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 04:05 PM

8. You talk like the Keystone Pipeline is the first pipeline in the country

Want to venture a guess how many there are and how long they have been there?

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Response to oflguy (Reply #8)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 08:59 AM

10. No I don't talk like that, but you are free to draw your own conclusions....NT

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Response to nolens volens (Reply #7)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 11:55 PM

9. 50%?

How much do you pay per KWH?

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Response to oflguy (Reply #9)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 09:00 AM

11. In Mass it's $0.12kwh nt

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Response to nolens volens (Reply #11)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 09:11 AM

12. Wow

Entergy in Arkansas and Louisiana charges 7 cents per kwh (residential rate)

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Response to oflguy (Reply #12)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 09:25 AM

13. Cost of living here isn't

comparable unfortunately...houses fifteen years ago near Boston that could be had for 150,000 are worth a half a million these days...the suburbs of Boston are outrageously priced, which is true of most urban centers these days I think.


It's why a lot of us like to retire south, we sell our land here and come and stay in the warm and friendly south where it seems all are still welcome....

I served at Fort Benning for a while during the 1970s and still have an uncle living outside of Atlanta...I almost never came back north...I loved it in Georgia and Alabama when I served....I loved the warmth, the friendly people, the food, it was all good....and I still enjoy my visits today.

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Response to nolens volens (Reply #7)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 09:44 AM

14. "We stayed with oil because it's cheap"

No, silly, we stay with oil because it works really, really well.

How is your solar powered car doing?

For that matter, how has everything worked out since you went off the grid?

Forget about what they cost. How do they work? What do you do on a cloudy day or when the sun goes down?
Did you call somebody to connect you to the grid again?

Can you drive that solar-powered car to a big oil protest at night? If so, it better not be far away.

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Response to oflguy (Reply #14)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 10:39 AM

15. I don't mention

solar in my response, I believe I said "energy options". There are options besides oil and besides solar, with respect to the power grid I think nuclear is a far better option. The issue of where to site the plants and how to deal with the waste hasn't been properly addressed but nuclear is clean, and a combination of all options versus a sole reliance on oil isn't a smart strategic plan for any nation. Regarding automobiles, oil may be the better choice but if the only thing requiring oil were autos our need for foreign oil would drop dramatically...natural gas and hydrogen options are also possible if we were to choose to do so.

If your entire defense industry relies on oil for national defense guess what most of your foreign policy might have to revolve around? If you guessed easy access to foreign oil reserves you'd be spot on...the Nazis and the Rising Sun were brought to their knees because they no longer had access to the oil reserves to fuel their war machine.

How long does the US last without oil?

I understand oil isn't going anywhere, but a failure to research alternatives and inspire a healthy research and competitive environment for options is simply good government policy because one of the few things the constitution actually empowers government to do is provide for common defense and general welfare, reliance on single sourcing of fuel needs hardly seems wise in light of the places where oil is most easily accessed.

But hey what do I know, our current plan of endless wars with thousands of young American troops maimed and hundreds more killed each year seem to concern no one, at least not for the last eight years anyway....and since less than 1% of the nation actually does what I did and serves the country in uniform (infantry during the 70s and 80s) the other 99% don't much do anything but pay lip service to those troops....apparently as long as they are in harm's way but folks get their oil everything is fine.

You're right I can't imagine why we might as a nation want to consider alternative energy sources.

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Response to oflguy (Reply #14)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 09:10 PM

18. I'm all for solar

I install it for a living and have it on my house. Unfortunately it is still not for everybody financially. But the costs are coming down as new technologies and installation techniques continue to improve.

I think using the sun and wind is one of the coolest things going right now. Unfortunately, the sun does not always shine and the wind does not always blow so these methods are not a total solution to weaning ourselves off oil. You just can't get around it - oil and gas work really, really well.

If hydrogen as a fuel can be improved, I'm all for that also.

What annoys me is the people that show their ignorance when they think oil and gas can be abandoned in lieu of "clean" energy. I have yet to see a replacement for aircraft. Kerosene still rules jet engines. 100 low lead still works best in reciprocating engines. When these people start driving wind, solar and hydrogen powered cars, I'll shut up.

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Response to oflguy (Reply #4)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 11:22 AM

17. My electric rate is $.19252/kWh up to 130% of my "baseline." Above that it goes up to $.39701.

That's for the winter. Summer rates are about a penny higher in each tier. My baseline allowance is 276 kWh per month.

https://www.sdge.com/sites/default/files/regulatory/03-01-17%20Schedule%20DR%20Total%20Rates%20Table2.pdf

So glad I got rooftop solar seven years ago. My latest bill 2/8 - 3/10 comes to $40.65 including fixed costs. That is pretty low for San Diego.

My rooftop system is small, just 1.4 kW. If I could go back in time I would spend the extra bucks for another kW, but it's worked out well anyway.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #17)

Fri Mar 17, 2017, 09:12 PM

19. That's pretty expensive

Why is it so high there?

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Response to oflguy (Reply #19)

Sat Mar 18, 2017, 05:21 AM

20. It's California. Everything is expensive here because a lot of people want to live here, compounded

...by the fact that the state is run by leftist authoritarians.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Thu Mar 16, 2017, 01:02 PM

3. An automated monitoring system would do a more thorough job

and be more accurate and efficient

But since the farm is so under-utilized I guess it doesn't really matter

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