Sciencesciencehydrogentraingermanygreenenergyfuelcellnonoxwatersmog

Mon Sep 17, 2018, 06:57 PM

'World's first' hydrogen-powered trains are now in service across Germany



Eco-friendly engines can cover 620 miles on a single tank of fuel and produce only water vapour

Germany has rolled out the world's first hydrogen-powered train signalling the start of a push to challenge the might of polluting diesel locomotives.

Hydrogen fuel cells are more co-friendly technology, creating electricity to power a battery and motor by mixing hydrogen and oxygen.

The only emissions are steam and water with excess energy stored in ion lithium batteries on board the train.

However, they are more expensive than the fossil fuel based trains commonly used in the region where they have been unveiled...more: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6177347/Worlds-hydrogen-powered-train-unveiled-Germany.html

Hydrogen- the Next Big Thing™


4 replies, 252 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 4 replies Author Time Post
Reply 'World's first' hydrogen-powered trains are now in service across Germany (Original post)
Aquila Sep 2018 OP
Solesurvivor Sep 2018 #1
Aquila Sep 2018 #2
fools_gold Sep 2018 #3
Aquila Sep 2018 #4

Response to Aquila (Original post)

Mon Sep 17, 2018, 07:01 PM

1. How is the hydrogen made?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Solesurvivor (Reply #1)

Mon Sep 17, 2018, 07:19 PM

2. Germany has lots of solar and wind energy

"The manufacturer and the railway operator say they aim to use wind power and other energy sources to achieve zero emissions in the future." https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20180917_04/


Wind powered H2 station in Yorkshire, UK



Solar Hydrogen: Fuel of the Future

Renewable hydrogen produced using solar energy to split water is the energy fuel of the future. Accelerated innovation in both major domains of solar energy (photovoltaics and concentrated solar power) has resulted in the rapid fall of the solar electricity price, opening the route to a number of practical applications using solar H2... https://www.amazon.com/Solar-Hydrogen-Future-Mario-Pagliaro/dp/1849731950

Jack Nicholson tried to tell everyone about H2 in 1978


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Aquila (Reply #2)

Mon Sep 17, 2018, 07:53 PM

3. "...In the future."

"The manufacturer and the railway operator say they aim to use wind power and other energy sources to achieve zero emissions in the future."

For now, the old fashioned way - steam reforming of hydrocarbons.

" Currently the dominant technology for direct production is steam reforming from hydrocarbons. Many other methods are known including electrolysis and thermolysis."

"... the majority of hydrogen (∼95%) is produced from fossil fuels by steam reforming or partial oxidation of methane and coal gasification with only a small quantity by other routes such as biomass gasification or electrolysis of water."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_production

Still, it's a good step forward. Just need to get the costs competitive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to fools_gold (Reply #3)

Mon Sep 17, 2018, 08:10 PM

4. Daimler's Prof. Dr. Christian Mohrdieck on H2 and Natural Gas



...A very popular argument in the public discussion is that battery electric vehicles are more efficient than hydrogen. This is true on vehicle level because the conversion of hydrogen is an extra step that is not involved in battery electric vehicles. However, this is not taking the whole picture into account. If we drive a battery vehicle today, using electricity from the European electricity mix, then the well-to-wheel energy balance of this vehicle is slightly worse than the energy balance of a fuel cell vehicle that uses hydrogen made from natural gas. This is due to the fact that electricity production is not very energy efficient in Europe. We still have a lot of coal and nuclear energy involved, which is very energy intensive...more

Bjørn Simonsen of NEL Hydrogen, builder of Denmark's 100% green national H2 station network:

Q: One of the advantages of battery-powered electric vehicles is that there are less conversion losses, and therefore the efficiency is higher.

A: The entire efficiency question loses importance with the energy regime we’re moving into. We’re coming from a mentality where we are used to thinking about energy as a limited resource. If you have a barrel of oil, it’s extremely important to use it efficiently. However, you can use it across several days or years. Whatever you don’t use one day, you still have it for the next day. Whereas when we look at renewables, you have to use them when they’re there.

We have to look at energy with new eyes. What matters is what does it cost? It’s not necessarily all about the total efficiency. Prices are low enough to make hydrogen and distribute it to fueling stations at costs that are comparable to what we’re used to today with gasoline and diesel. If you charge your car from your rooftop solar at home, it’s obviously more efficient than converting it to hydrogen first, but you won’t see people driving their electric vehicles to a solar farm far from their homes to charge whenever it’s really nice and sunny outside. That is why the two technologies will live side by side and complement each other...more: https://www.pv-magazine.com/2017/08/30/future-pv-the-feasibility-of-solar-powered-hydrogen-production/

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Sciencesciencehydrogentraingermanygreenenergyfuelcellnonoxwatersmog