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Mon Dec 31, 2018, 04:55 PM

General Electric and H2V Commit to Massive Production of Hydrogen by Electrolysis



Paris, France - December 6, 2018: Addressing the global energy trend for cleaner energy and a reduced carbon footprint, H2V INDUSTRY today announced it has awarded GE Power's Grid Solutions business a contract for the turnkey supply of two 225 kV/30 kV electrical substations. These substations will feed the first 100 MW H2V INDUSTRY production units of the Port-Jérôme factories near Le Havre (76-Normandie) and Loon Plage near Dunkirk (Dunkerque, 59-Nord). H2V INDUSTRY forecasts the creation of approximately 200 jobs at each factory site in France in 2022. According to the “Hydrogen, Scaling up” study conducted by McKinsey for the Hydrogen Council, this energy source could reduce annual CO2 emissions by around 6 metric gigatons, compared with current levels.

World’s First Innovative Mass Production of Green Hydrogen

Recognized as a critical contributor to the energy transition’s success, green hydrogen is the most abundant element on earth and plays an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Green hydrogen contains up to three times more energy per unit mass than diesel, and two and a half times more than natural gas. To address customers’ needs for green hydrogen related to the growing global trend of decarbonization, H2V INDUSTRY’s intends to establish factories in France to support Europe’s energy transition. These factories will focus on the mass production of hydrogen via the electrolysis of water, thereby delivering green hydrogen at a zero-carbon footprint.

Green Hydrogen and its Zero-Carbon Footprint

Currently, 95 percent of hydrogen is produced from fossil fuel sources resulting in pollution, whereas green hydrogen produced from water and renewable power sources guarantees a zero-carbon footprint. H2V INDUSTRY has chosen the electrolysis of water as the innovative method to produce green hydrogen. The electrolysis of water involves using electrical energy to separate water into hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2), thereby converting electrical energy into chemical energy. This green hydrogen can be stored for later use on the network, produced where there is a high concentration of renewables power sources or transported to the consumption sources. It can also be directly injected into industrial processes for decarbonization...more: https://fuelcellsworks.com/news/h2v-and-ge-commit-to-massive-production-of-hydrogen-by-electrolysis/

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Reply General Electric and H2V Commit to Massive Production of Hydrogen by Electrolysis (Original post)
Aquila Dec 2018 OP
Bob the Bilderberger Dec 2018 #1

Response to Aquila (Original post)

Mon Dec 31, 2018, 05:23 PM

1. Submarine electrolysis

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When I was in the Navy, we used this same technology but to make oxygen while we dumped the hydrogen over the side.

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