Sciencesciencehydrogenh2cleangreenpowerenergyrenewablestoragetrainfuel

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 05:17 PM

Hydrogen Comes of Age: Perhaps, finally, hydrogens moment has arrived.



Sunday Train: Hydrogen may have a future on the rails

RedGreenandBlue.org | Bianca Nogrady | 1/6/2019

Jorgo Chatzimarkakis was refueling his hydrogen fuel-cell car at one of the 50-plus refueling stations scattered around Germany when a Tesla driver, who was recharging his own car, approached. The man was excited to see a hydrogen-powered car in action, and was brimming with questions. Chatzimarkakis, who is secretary general of Hydrogen Europe, was happy to answer them, and the two talked for several minutes. But by then, the hydrogen car was fully refueled, while the Tesla driver still faced a long wait while his battery recharged.

This is reality,” says Chatzimarkakis. “Nowadays the fueling stations are ready, the car is ready, I can plan my trip from Switzerland to Denmark and into Norway without any problems.”

The vision of a hydrogen-fueled world has had more near misses than Wile E. Coyote. In 1923, British geneticist J.B.S. Haldane imagined a network of hydrogen-generating windmills powering Britain, but nothing came of it. In 1970, South African-born electrochemist John Bockris first used the term “hydrogen economy” in a speech, and later published a book describing what a solar-hydrogen-powered world might look like. But again, nothing changed. In 2002, American economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin argued that hydrogen could take over from oil and that the future of energy lay in hydrogen-powered fuel cells...snip

Hydrogen Comes of Age

Perhaps, finally, hydrogen’s moment has arrived.

Japan is planning to use the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games to showcase its vision for a hydrogen society and has invested US$348 million in establishing hydrogen refueling stations and other infrastructure.

Germany has launched the world’s first hydrogen-powered trains to complement a growing number of hydrogen refueling stations across the country.

Switzerland is purchasing 1,000 hydrogen-powered trucks

Norway has had hydrogen refueling stations since 2006

South Korea is investing US$2.33 billion over the next five years to create hydrogen refueling stations, fuel-cell vehicle plants, fuel-cell buses and hydrogen storage systems.

Australia has seen both its national science agency CSIRO and chief scientist Alan Finkel separately report their visions for a hydrogen-powered nation and export industry.

At the heart of the hydrogen economy is the use of electricity from renewable sources such as solar, wind and hydropower to split water into oxygen and hydrogen — a process called electrolysis. That “green hydrogen” can then be used in fuel cells to generate electricity...snip

more: http://redgreenandblue.org/2019/01/06/sunday-train-hydrogen-may-future-rails/



Related:



2 January 2019: Daimler subsidiary NuCellSys becomes Mercedes-Benz Fuel Cell GmbH

"The potential of fuel cell technology, and of hydrogen for energy storage, is beyond question."

"Fuel cell technology is an integral part of our drive system strategy"
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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 05:21 PM

1. Most people don't know it, but cars used to use alcohol as auto anti-freeze too.

Any guesses why that practice was ended?

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Response to Nostrings (Reply #1)

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 05:28 PM

2. WOW

Talk about missing THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AND EVERY SINGLE LINK

Over a few years, I've seen hydrogen articles bring out a special kind of denial.

Thanks for continuing the phenomenon.

When future historians study why the US missed the hydrogen revolution- and how China came to dominate the energy industries of the future, they can look at "replies" like yours.

50-60 years ago the US was truly a superpower. Now it couldn't even build a national highway system, like the great Americans of a couple generations ago did.

What happened? Something in the water?

Any ideas?

Of course not.

It would be hilarious if it wasn't so sad.

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Response to Aquila (Reply #2)

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 05:33 PM

4. As someone who is involved in the actual making of complex things...

I'll take what I know of history and of current highly technical and technological manufacturing over hype and hope.

YMMV.





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Response to Aquila (Reply #2)

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 06:34 PM

6. Has China figured out how to make hydrogen fuel

without using more energy than the hydrogen provides?

Did you see the links I provided for a hydrogen car and truck for sale?

Now may be time for you to jump into the hydrogen powered revolution.

Perhaps, finally, your hydrogen moment has arrived.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 05:31 PM

3. And how much $$$ did it cost German taxpayers to refuel Jorgo Chatzimarkakis's H2 vehicle??

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 05:49 PM

5. By the time my 12-year-old Hyundai Azera reaches 20-years-old, I hope to see hydrogen as...

... an available alternative in a replacement vehicle...

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2019, 06:55 PM

7. wow, look... ANOTHER taxpayer/government funded project where the thing

doesn't have to be financially viable.
Hmph, Imagine that shit.

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Sciencesciencehydrogenh2cleangreenpowerenergyrenewablestoragetrainfuel