Sciencescience

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 08:44 PM

Do Trees Talk to Each Other?


the Eifel Mountains in western Germany, through cathedral-like groves of oak and beech, and there’s a strange unmoored feeling of entering a fairy tale. The trees have become vibrantly alive and charged with wonder. They’re communicating with one another, for starters. They’re involved in tremendous struggles and death-defying dramas. To reach enormousness, they depend on a complicated web of relationships, alliances and kinship networks.

Wise old mother trees feed their saplings with liquid sugar and warn the neighbors when danger approaches. Reckless youngsters take foolhardy risks with leaf-shedding, light-chasing and excessive drinking, and usually pay with their lives. Crown princes wait for the old monarchs to fall, so they can take their place in the full glory of sunlight. It’s all happening in the ultra-slow motion that is tree time, so that what we see is a freeze-frame of the action.

My guide here is a kind of tree whisperer. Peter Wohlleben, a German forester and author, has a rare understanding of the inner life of trees, and is able to describe it in accessible, evocative language. He stands very tall and straight, like the trees he most admires, and on this cold, clear morning, the blue of his eyes precisely matches the blue of the sky. Wohlleben has devoted his life to the study and care of trees. He manages this forest as a nature reserve, and lives with his wife, Miriam, in a rustic cabin near the remote village of Hümmel.

Now, at the age of 53, he has become an unlikely publishing sensation. His book The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate, written at his wife’s insistence, sold more than 800,000 copies in Germany, and has now hit the best-seller lists in 11 other countries, including the United States and Canada. (Wohlleben has turned his attention to other living things as well, in his Inner Life of Animals, newly issued in translation.)


Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-whispering-trees-180968084/#mihfLcgEyosDmr6L.99
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Maybe what we heard on those mescaline fueled Frisbee games in the woods WAS real...

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Arrow 38 replies Author Time Post
Reply Do Trees Talk to Each Other? (Original post)
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 OP
freedumb2003 Jan 2019 #1
Da Mannn Jan 2019 #2
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 #5
Da Mannn Jan 2019 #8
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 #9
Da Mannn Jan 2019 #11
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 #12
Da Mannn Jan 2019 #14
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 #15
oflguy Jan 20 #19
Gamle-ged Jan 2019 #3
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 #6
Currentsitguy Jan 20 #16
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #22
Time Jan 2019 #4
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 #7
foia Jan 2019 #10
wonderwarthog Jan 2019 #13
Currentsitguy Jan 20 #17
oldenuff35 Jan 20 #18
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #21
Currentsitguy Jan 20 #24
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #20
Currentsitguy Jan 20 #25
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #34
Currentsitguy Jan 21 #36
oldenuff35 Jan 20 #28
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #30
Squeek Jan 20 #23
Currentsitguy Jan 20 #26
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #31
It Guy Jan 20 #27
oldenuff35 Jan 20 #29
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #33
oldenuff35 Jan 20 #35
wonderwarthog Jan 20 #32
SatansSon666 Jan 22 #37
wonderwarthog Jan 22 #38

Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 08:47 PM

1. ask Clint Eastwood

 

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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 08:52 PM

2. Unless Treebeard walks out of the forest, the answer is no.

Its like having a conversation with your coffee table. It says nothing, but tree humpers pretend otherwise.

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Response to Da Mannn (Reply #2)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 08:58 PM

5. Apparently



you missed the good stuff in the 70s.



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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 09:03 PM

8. Thank God I did.

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Response to Da Mannn (Reply #8)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 09:09 PM

9. ...




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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #9)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 09:32 PM

11. so you're saying doing drugs is enlightening? somehow good for you?

Why am I not surprised?

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Response to Da Mannn (Reply #11)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 09:50 PM

12. Not saying it is good.



It just is.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #12)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 10:03 PM

14. So how is not doing drugs bad?

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Response to Da Mannn (Reply #14)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 10:07 PM

15. Do you take asprin



for a headache?





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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #15)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 09:57 AM

19. I've never heard trees talk after taking asprins

Should I?

Maybe I'm not listening closely enough.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 08:54 PM

3. There's no doubt that trees get wood, so they prolly talk about it...

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #3)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 09:00 PM

6. ...



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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #6)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 01:08 AM

16. Rule 34


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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #16)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 10:54 AM

22. Yin and yang in everthing!




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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 08:56 PM

4. This being in Germany, would it be safe to assume that female trees will soon be wearing burkas?

You know, not to offend the newcomer trees?

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Response to Time (Reply #4)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 09:01 PM

7. Possibly



But most likely not.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 09:27 PM

10. Dude probably drinks lots of Jagermeister

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Response to foia (Reply #10)

Sat Jan 19, 2019, 10:02 PM

13. Let's not...



be too hasty!


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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 01:11 AM

17. I have no doubt

Our acre of land has 27 very mature red and white oaks on it. You can see how they reach for and support one another. It killed us when two years ago we had to take one down due to old fire damage that left it hollow at the base and in danger of falling on our home.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #17)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 05:11 AM

18. Most trees are a renewable resource. I don't mean to hurt your feelings.

We own a dozen sections of old growth timber mostly pine and fir three to six feet across on the stump but a few that make the 7 foot range. 400 acres of our land has redwoods. We thin and log the rest of it but do not harvest the redwoods. When nature damages or takes one down the redwood mills bid on the tree and come in and remove it.

We take very good care of our timber but about the only thing they whisper to is my bank account.

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Response to oldenuff35 (Reply #18)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 10:53 AM

21. So you are caring for the trees



It is a fair trade, as I see it.

I believe it benefits us to appreciate their beauty as well, which whispers to more than the bank account, which I'm sure you do!


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Response to oldenuff35 (Reply #18)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 12:42 PM

24. Not an option here

The primary reason I bought the house was the tree cover. It was critically important to me when house shopping to find a heavily wooded lot.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #17)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 10:48 AM

20. Sounds beautiful!


I hope the Oaks know they are appreciated!


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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #20)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 12:43 PM

25. They'd better be!

We've spent close to $20k over the last four years feeding, thinning, etc to keep them healthy.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #25)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 07:29 PM

34. WOW!



That's a big investment!


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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #34)

Mon Jan 21, 2019, 07:52 AM

36. Well, when our house burned

There was a lot of heat damage to the overhanging trees. It seemed only prudent to thin and treat everything so as to minimize the chances of big branches falling on our new roof and essentially new home. Rather than hiring a hack with a chainsaw we decided to do it right and brought in a professional Arborist. Aside from the aesthetic pleasure it brings us the energy and air conditioning savings we get from the shade is well worth it, not to mention the fact I only have to cut the grass maybe 4 or 5 times a season.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #20)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 03:49 PM

28. Forests need to be managed to be healthy and productive.

This is thick stands of timber on steep ground. It is difficult and takes a lot of time to properly thin and to clean up the buildup of dead fuel on the ground.

The end result is a forest that is much healthier, has less potential for wildfires, and is much more productive for generations to come. It is straight up scientific forest management.

This process is also exactly what the rabid environmental Nazis on the left protested against, and stopped in the 70's, and 80's.

It has taken us over a decade to put this forest back where nature would have taken it without the interference of man. When we started fighting the wildfires we also mandated and should have taken on the responsibility of more intensive forest and wildlife management.

You can not abruptly change, diminish, or stop, how mother nature cleans the forest floors and thins the forest and think things are going to work out well over the decades to come.

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Response to oldenuff35 (Reply #28)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 07:20 PM

30. Agree


Forestry is a science.

It's very big in this part of NW Pa.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 12:33 PM

23. Living in the woods

as I do, not only do I believe the trees talk to each other, I sometimes can hear them whispering to me. Often it's on a quiet summer day when the wind is a gentle breeze and I can hear the leaves whispering all around me.

One very special tree has been a survivor... years ago Mr S planted a little red maple on the other side of the fence outside the kitchen window on the south side. In winter there are no leaves, so the sunlight comes through and warms my kitchen. In summer, it shades the little doggy patio from the sun. Many dogs have rested there in the shade enjoying the days.

At various points in its life it's been assaulted by a bear (branches broken off), invasions of caterpillars, a woodpecker, and an errant snowplow. The huge gash from the snowplow is almost healed...it's grown big and strong and it provides a safe place for birds to roost right next to the feeders. I love it, and I believe it loves me back. My other special trees are a weeping willow, another red maple, and a dogwood, all out by the big pond.

I feel so lucky to be able to live out here among the trees.


PS...and I don't do drugs or drink so it's not substance induced hallucinations.


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Response to Squeek (Reply #23)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 12:47 PM

26. You have pretty much described our thoughts exactly

We love and care for our trees and in turn they cool and shade us in the summer. When the time comes for us to move we will not sell to anyone who will not care for them the way we do.

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Response to Squeek (Reply #23)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 07:23 PM

31. Thanks, Squeek!


That sounds really nice, and very well written on top of that!

You really should look into submitting articles to magazines, we are lucky to have you here!

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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 02:05 PM

27. Its a seasonal thing with me. I slaughter a bunch of trees with a chainsaw and

not once have I heard one scream. There is some sap though, is that tree blood?

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Response to It Guy (Reply #27)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 03:54 PM

29. We normally go through a dozen cord a wood a year here. Almost twice that this year.

We bring it to our home complex a log truck load at a time. Next years wood is already cut and cross stacked on twenty pallets so it will cure well next summer then each half cord pallet will be stacked into our wood shed.

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Response to oldenuff35 (Reply #29)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 07:26 PM

33. I cut wood and split it



with an axe on this farm in my young days.

Now, thank God, we have a gas operated splitter.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #33)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 09:28 PM

35. we have a couple splitters. We bought a new speed pro in December I needed more wood fast

I have a 38 ton hydraulic but it can not keep up with this beast.

Keep your hands back and make sure you have a bunch of kids to pick the wood up and stack it.



We worked in 10 minute rotations of four people on this splitter, one feeding the operator wood and another splitting and two kids picking it up and tossing it into a small dump truck. We averaged right at two cord per hour.

I put the hydraulic splitter up on the flatbed we were bringing the wood in on and we put it vertical and busted the bg rounds in half and quarters so they could be handled. Some of the butt cuts were 30" and were too damn heavy to lift.

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Response to It Guy (Reply #27)

Sun Jan 20, 2019, 07:25 PM

32. Yes!



Sap IS tree blood, and I would guess serves a simular purpose to our blood!




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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Tue Jan 22, 2019, 10:27 AM

37. The one I hit on my snowbike didn't say a damn thing.

It never even tried to get out of the way either. Good thing I didn't have my chainsaw, it would be heating my cottage next year.

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Response to SatansSon666 (Reply #37)

Tue Jan 22, 2019, 07:15 PM

38. Glad you're o.k., but...



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