Sciencesciencebiologypaleontology

Thu Mar 7, 2019, 12:34 PM

Baby T. Rex Was an Adorable Ball of Fluff



It may be hard to imagine towering Tyrannosaurus rex as tiny, but the toothy
Cretaceous giant didn't spring from an egg fully grown. In fact, T. rex hatchlings
were about the size of very skinny turkeys, with "arms" that were longer in
proportion to their tiny bodies than in adults. And each baby T. rex was c
overed in a coat of downy feathers.

What's more, T. rex's feathers likely grew along the animal's head and tail into
adulthood, according to new reconstructions that represent the most accurate
models of the dinosaur to date.

These and many more T. rex surprises abound in T. rex: The Ultimate Predator,
a new exhibit opening March 11 at the American Museum of Natural History
(AMNH) in New York City. While T. rex is one of the most iconic dinosaurs,
the exhibition presents new discoveries that are transforming scientists'
understanding of this colossal carnivore and its tyrannosaur cousins,
all of which likely had feathers, too.

Most of the tyrannosaur species featured in the exhibit were unknown to
science prior to 2000, Martin Schwabacher, an exhibition writer at the AMNH,
told Live Science. Early tyrannosaurs first appeared about 167 million years ago,
around 100 million years before T. rex ruled the Cretaceous. These early
tyrannosaurs had relatively long arms, and were smaller and faster than the giant T. rex.



https://www.livescience.com/64936-t-rex-new-look-exhibit.html



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Reply Baby T. Rex Was an Adorable Ball of Fluff (Original post)
Micrometer Mar 2019 OP
Da Mannn Mar 2019 #1
Micrometer Mar 2019 #3
nolidad Mar 2019 #2
SatansSon666 Mar 2019 #4
Micrometer Mar 2019 #5
Cold Warrior Mar 2019 #6

Response to Micrometer (Original post)

Thu Mar 7, 2019, 12:42 PM

1. My daughter (when little) would have brought this one home....

cute and fluffy? she loves it.

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Response to Da Mannn (Reply #1)

Thu Mar 7, 2019, 08:14 PM

3. I wonder what the leash law is?

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Response to Micrometer (Original post)

Thu Mar 7, 2019, 06:05 PM

2. Nice artist misconception!

Cute little beak on a creature with a jaw!

I will wait till they8 re review this peer reviewed finding and make the necessary corrections.

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Response to nolidad (Reply #2)

Fri Mar 8, 2019, 05:17 AM

4. "Gonna wait until peer review"



Poor nolidad.

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Response to nolidad (Reply #2)

Fri Mar 8, 2019, 07:25 PM

5. Looks good to me.

How about this peer reviewed museum exhibit:


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Response to Micrometer (Reply #5)

Fri Mar 8, 2019, 09:19 PM

6. Like many Creationists, our colleague criticises science for being self-corrective

Unlike his superstition that got it exactly right the first time (as superstitions do).

That said, thanks for posting this. The emerging picture of dinosaurs is fascinating.

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