Sciencesciencedesalinationwatersolardesertnamibia

Sun May 26, 2019, 06:09 PM

This desalination device delivers cheap, clean water with just solar power

Making ocean water safe to drink is usually an expensive and polluting prospect. This Finnish startup has found a way to do it with clean energy and a tiny footprint.



5/23/19 | Fast Company By Adele Peters

In a coastal city in Namibia, a small shipping container near the beach sits surrounded by solar panels. Inside, new technology uses that solar power to turn ocean water from the Atlantic into drinking water.

Namibia is in the middle of a prolonged drought. The president recently declared the second state of emergency in three years because the lack of rain is leading to severe food shortages. But if scaled up, this technology could help supply households and agriculture with fresh water. The basic tech that it uses for desalination, called reverse osmosis, isn’t new. But because the system can run on solar power, without the use of batteries, it avoids the large carbon footprint of a typical energy-hungry desalination plant. It’s also significantly cheaper over the lifetime of the system.

“Basically the running costs are zero, because solar is free,” says Antti Pohjola, CEO of Solar Water Solutions, the Finland-based startup that makes the technology. Desalination usually uses large amounts of electricity because reverse osmosis requires keeping water at a constant pressure. The new tech keeps water at the right pressure independently, so it can work without connecting to the grid or using a set of expensive batteries to store power.

In some remote communities, especially ones on small islands, the systems could replace pricey, polluting diesel-powered desalination. Because it can eliminate the operating cost of diesel fuel, the technology can pay for itself within three to four years...more https://www.fastcompany.com/90353878/this-solar-powered-desalination-device-delivers-cheap-clean-water

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Reply This desalination device delivers cheap, clean water with just solar power (Original post)
Aquila May 2019 OP
Thorson May 2019 #1
Aquila May 2019 #2
It Guy May 2019 #5
Thorson May 27 #7
His Daughter May 2019 #4
Thorson May 27 #8
His Daughter May 2019 #3
Ax Crazy May 2019 #6
_eek Jun 5 #10
oflguy May 28 #9

Response to Aquila (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 06:28 PM

1. It sounds like the best plan so far

I recently read that the salt left behind from desalination is a problem as it make the ocean water extra salty.
I wonder if that matters though, I would think that the fresh water coming back into the ocean would equal it out again.
I say that because I also read that there is X amount of water in the earth and the quantity doesn't change, only the form of the water changes, it evaporates in one place and comes back elsewhere as rain or snow. Is this true?
I'm just making a guess since we can't believe everything we read.

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Response to Thorson (Reply #1)

Sun May 26, 2019, 07:13 PM

2. The brine doesn't necessarily need to be pumped back into the ocean

It's a concern for sure though, and needs to be addressed.

From MIT

Turning desalination waste into a useful resource

Process developed at MIT could turn concentrated brine into useful chemicals, making desalination more efficient.
http://news.mit.edu/2019/brine-desalianation-waste-sodium-hydroxide-0213

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Response to Aquila (Reply #2)

Sun May 26, 2019, 10:20 PM

5. Meh... theres other ways of desalination that dont require any energy other than direct sunlight.

And the chemicals alluded to is sodium chloride - salt, and minerals.

So some neo genius figures out how to replace AC pumps with solar driven DC pumps in an RO system... and then suckers some other dummy into publishing the BS and blowing smoke up the asses of other idiots like this is somehow a breakthrough.

It’s not.

One can dig a shallow hole and either line it with plastic or just in proximity to water and placing a layer of plastic over it with a small rock placed on top in the middle, to cause a depression. This will cause condensation to collect on the underside and dribble down to where the rock is to be collected in a can, then suck it out with a hose.

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Response to Aquila (Reply #2)

Mon May 27, 2019, 07:27 AM

7. Thanks for the info.

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Response to Thorson (Reply #1)

Sun May 26, 2019, 09:18 PM

4. Too small an output

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Response to His Daughter (Reply #4)

Mon May 27, 2019, 07:27 AM

8. Thanks for the info.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 09:18 PM

3. Too small an output for serious urban use

Output is directly proportional to power used.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 11:26 PM

6. Looks like the subject of a future Thunderf00t video.

I don't mean to be cynical, and I hope this works out great. Just looks like it's promising more than it can deliver.

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Response to Ax Crazy (Reply #6)

Wed Jun 5, 2019, 03:23 PM

10. I love his debunks.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:48 PM

9. It's FREE!

YEA!!

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Sciencesciencedesalinationwatersolardesertnamibia