Sciencesciencecaliforniasolarenergycurtailmentgreenselfsufficienth2hydrogenexcess

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 08:08 PM

LA TIMES: California has too much solar power. That might be good for ratepayers



LA TIMES | Sammy Roth | June 5, 2019

California set two renewable energy records last week: the most solar power ever flowing on the state’s main electric grid, and the most solar power ever taken offline because it wasn’t needed.

There’s no contradiction: As California utilities buy more and more solar power as part of the state’s quest to confront climate change, supply and demand are increasingly out of sync. The state’s fleet of solar farms and rooftop panels frequently generate more electricity than Californians use during the middle of the day — a phenomenon that has sent lawmakers and some climate advocates scrambling to find ways to save the extra sunlight rather than let it go to waste.

But for ratepayers, an oversupply of solar power might actually be a good thing.

New research published in the peer-reviewed journal Solar Energy suggests California should embrace the idea of building more solar panels than it can consistently use, rather than treating oversupply as a problem to be solved. It sounds counterintuitive, but intentionally overbuilding solar facilities — and accepting they’ll often need to be dialed down in the absence of sufficient demand — may be the best way to keep electricity prices low on a power grid dominated by renewable energy, the research found.

In a study published in March, New York-based researchers Richard Perez and Karl Rábago argue that solar power has gotten so inexpensive that overbuilding it will probably be the cheapest way to keep the lights on during cloudy or overcast days — cheaper than relying entirely on batteries. Solar power can meet high levels of daytime electricity demand without energy storage, the researchers say, as long as there are enough solar panels on the grid during times when none of them are producing at full capacity.

“It’s not like solar is going to be available all the time,” said Perez, a solar energy expert at the State University of New York at Albany. “At night you will need storage, and on cloudy days you will need storage. But you will need much less of it.”.... more: https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-solar-batteries-renewable-energy-california-20190605-story.html

Can you say 0.02 Cents per kWh? I knew you could

If only there was a way to store this excess renewable energy...

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Reply LA TIMES: California has too much solar power. That might be good for ratepayers (Original post)
Aquila Thursday OP
D26-15 Thursday #1
Aquila Thursday #2
D26-15 Thursday #3
CokeMachine1 Thursday #4
SatansSon666 Friday #5

Response to Aquila (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 08:35 PM

1. Maybe they could set up homeless camps under them.

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Response to D26-15 (Reply #1)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 09:01 PM

2. Nothing is funnier than homeless people, eh?

Jesus Christ, what a wasteland

Maybe there wouldn't be so many homeless

IF THE FUCKERS IN WALL STREET AND WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF CRIMINALS AND DRAFT DODGERS DIDN'T SHIP OUR JOBS TO CHINA

The US is a failed nation.

The Visigoths have climbed over the gates.

Laugh it up.

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Response to Aquila (Reply #2)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 09:20 PM

3. Yeah, maybe they could set up homeless camps under them.

I imagine the homeless in California alone could fill them up.

Right Aquila?



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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 10:02 PM

4. What, no hydrogen story?

Did you see the thread about the hydrogen station blowing up and suppliers of vehicles curtailing sales because no one can fill up -- Norway?

Oops -- amirite?

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Response to CokeMachine1 (Reply #4)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 12:01 PM

5. his last line references H2

Can store the excess by converting the electrical energy to chemical energy through hydrolysis of H2O.
Instead of shutting it off. Make H2.

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Sciencesciencecaliforniasolarenergycurtailmentgreenselfsufficienth2hydrogenexcess