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Thu Aug 15, 2019, 06:41 PM

This plane can fly 500 miles, powered entirely by hydrogen. Largest zero-emissions plane to ever fly



This plane can fly 500 miles, powered entirely by hydrogen. The largest zero-emissions plane to ever fly without any fossil fuels

ZeroAvia says electric efficiency, fewer repairs, and onsite hydrogen production can make zero-emissions flight cheaper than burning jet-fuel

IEEE Spectrum | 14 AUG 2019

The aviation industry’s global trade group says electric airplanes are unlikely to be flying commercial routes before 2040. That pessimism from the International Air Transport Association is off by nearly two decades according to ZeroAvia, a fast-moving electric flight startup popping out of stealth mode today. For six months already, the Hollister, Calif.–based firm has been flying the world’s largest zero-emissions aircraft—the fuel cell-equipped prop-plane pictured above—and ZeroAvia vows that its powertrain design will be cutting both carbon and costs for regional flights in just 3 to 4 years.

“Right now we have an aircraft that’s six seats and 2 tons as an R&D demonstrator. Next year we’ll have a 20-seat aircraft and we’ll submit the design for certification,” says Val Miftakhov, ZeroAvia’s founder and CEO. “That’s what drives the 2022, 2023 timeline. At that point, we’re expecting to have certification and put the system into commercial service,” Miftakhov predicts.



ZeroAvia is making bold claims of the type that don’t usually pan out, but its leadership has credibility. Miftakhov founded and led eMotorWerks, a world leader in EV charging stations and grid-smart charging that Rome-based power giant Enel acquired in 2017. Several more core team members hail from eMotorWerks. Others joined from automakers Tesla and BMW, Paris-based industrial gases producer Air Liquide, and processor firm NVIDIA.

ZeroAvia is part of a wave of activity by zero-emissions transport developers who are returning to fuel cells after a decade of focus on battery-powered transport. Phoenix-based electric semi-truck developer Nikola Motor expects fuel cell propulsion to solve a slew of liabilities associated with battery-powered transport, including recharging delays, limited range, and weight. Railway operators in the U.K. and Germany are testing fuel cell trains to get away from diesel engines. And China, the world leader in battery EV deployment, recently started investing heavily in fuel cell technology....

...That last claim reflects a big bet on electrolysis and renewable energy. ZeroAvia plans to deliver zero-emissions performance by producing hydrogen via electrolyzers running on wind and solar power. Filling stations for fuel cell cars in California sell mostly cheaper “fossil” hydrogen made from natural gas, yet charge 2-3 times as much as the going price for gasoline (per km of driving delivered). But electrolyzers and renewable energy are getting cheaper, and Miftakhov plans to avoid hefty delivery charges paid by hydrogen filling stations by setting up on-site electrolysis plants at regional airports.more: https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/aerospace/aviation/stealthy-startup-promises-cheap-carbonfree-flying-via-hydrogen

------------"But electrolyzers and renewable energy are getting cheaper, and Miftakhov plans to avoid hefty delivery charges paid by hydrogen filling stations by setting up on-site electrolysis plants at regional airports---------------"


Not the first



RELATED: ChemistryWorld.com 8/12/19

Hydrogen storage gets real

As production costs fall and demand is poised to rocket, James Mitchell Crow finds the hydrogen economy is finally ready for take-off – as long as we can find ways to store it... more: https://www.chemistryworld.com/features/hydrogen-storage-gets-real/3010794.article

Another incredible news week for Hydrogen - the Next Big Thing™

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Reply This plane can fly 500 miles, powered entirely by hydrogen. Largest zero-emissions plane to ever fly (Original post)
Aquila Aug 2019 OP
Goldengirl Aug 2019 #1
fools_gold Aug 2019 #2
Aquila Aug 2019 #3
Solesurvivor Aug 2019 #4
Solesurvivor Aug 2019 #5
oflguy Aug 2019 #6

Response to Aquila (Original post)

Thu Aug 15, 2019, 07:06 PM

1. I wonder how much emissions it added to the air making the Hydrogen

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Response to Goldengirl (Reply #1)

Thu Aug 15, 2019, 07:20 PM

2. If you make it by electrolysis, with wind and solar energy

very, very little emissions.

There are other current methods of H2 production that do produce unwanted emissions, but the goal is to do it almost entirely with clean energy.

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Response to Goldengirl (Reply #1)

Thu Aug 15, 2019, 07:27 PM

3. H2 produced by Solar / Wind / Hydro ZERO emissions

From the IEEE Article:

------------"But electrolyzers and renewable energy are getting cheaper, and Miftakhov plans to avoid hefty delivery charges paid by hydrogen filling stations by setting up on-site electrolysis plants at regional airports---------------"



What usually happens to methane?

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Response to Aquila (Reply #3)

Thu Aug 15, 2019, 09:16 PM

4. Whats the cost of making a unit of hydrogen energy to say regular plane fuel?

i'm sure its clean and all but i bet its more expensive and less efficient

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Response to Aquila (Reply #3)

Thu Aug 15, 2019, 09:17 PM

5. If they could make a car run on that stuff as cheap or cheaper than gas and

it runs as good as a gas powered car then i'd be all for it but i'm not going to pay for it or have my tax dollars subsidize it

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Fri Aug 16, 2019, 08:28 AM

6. Jet fuel?

That plane uses 100 low lead aviation fuel, not kerosene

500 mile range ain't shit, especially when you consider FAA required fuel reserves

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