Sciencesciencecaliforniasolarenergycurtailmentgreenselfsufficienth2hydrogenexcesspower

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 06:33 PM

2.2 Cents per kWh Solar in CA



9/30/19

Community Choice Aggregator (CCA) East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) has announced two power purchase agreements (PPA) with an average price of 2.2¢/kWh. The individual project pricing, total solar modules onsite, and expected volumes of electricity delivered on an annual basis were blacked out in the draft PPAs available to the public (236 page pdf). But we were able to get the following information on the two contracts/projects:

sPower Solar + Storage Project: 20-year agreement for 125 MW of solar power and 80 MW/160 MWh of battery storage in southern California, developed by Salt Lake City-based sPower

Edwards Solar Project: 15-year agreement for 100 MW of solar power and virtual storage in Kern County, developed by San Diego-based Terra-Gen

While the exact pricing on either of the two projects was withheld, it is probable both of these projects have set pricing records for the United States – but we must also add caveats to solar plus storage projects now that we’re seeing a greater variety of large scale projects.

In the linked to Google spreadsheet the equations can be seen that developed the below image, which suggest that the blended rate of the two projects is still greater than the current record holder 8minute Solar Energy, and Jackpot Solar’s Idaho project. However, if we consider again that the two projects “average” 2.2¢/kWh ($22/MWh) – then we ought assume that the solar only project is priced higher than the solar+storage project. And, if we lower the price of the Edwards Solar project to 2.097¢/kWh, then accounting for the escalator and discount rates, we see that it would beat out 8minute’s record – and that the average between the two projects would allow for the sPower solar+storage project to also be lower priced than 8minute’s recently signed Eland project.... more: https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2019/09/30/solar-plus-storage-pricing-record-set-in-california/



Question for all the Expert Hydrogen Scholars on DI:

If electricity costs 2.2 Cents per kWh

How much does One Kilogram of Hydrogen cost?

10 replies, 130 views

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 06:40 PM

1. ''While the exact pricing on either of the two projects was withheld''...as always...SSDD.

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Response to quad489 (Reply #1)

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 06:51 PM

2. What an odd existence you seem to have

sitting around all day reloading DI threads to shit on them



Solar is here whether you like it or not

And there's not a GD thing you can do about it

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Response to Aquila (Reply #2)

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 07:04 PM

3. Solar has been here since the beginning......amazing how ignorant you are about it...

...and amazing how YOU never question the actual total costs, nor how much energy/greenhouse gasses were emitted, to built/transport/install those solar panels nor how many decades the ROI is.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 07:16 PM

4. And what exactly do they do at midnight on the last day of January when the wind is not blowing.

They burn coal or natural gas to supply their customers with electricity.

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Response to oldenuff35 (Reply #4)

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 08:20 PM

5. what is your point?

Many of us use generators to offset the discomfort of a power outage, myself incuded.

What is wrong with a power supplier using a more inefficient, and more expensive system to keep us warm and our food preserved when the more efficient system fails?



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Response to akaConcernedCanuk (Reply #5)

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 08:44 PM

6. you have no idea

We live off the grid by many miles. I am familiar with solar, wind and hydroelectric power. One home like you and I power is one thing. Providing power for the masses takes just a bit more than a portable generator.

First, they have zero storage so all power sources have to be on demand wind and solar will never be able to provide that.

This is the part of the fantasy they cannot overcome.

We make all of our own power but not from wind and solar that may or may not be there. Take a look at the idiots on the left who actually want to tear down all natural gas or coal generation facilities. That just is not going to work folks.

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Response to oldenuff35 (Reply #6)

Wed Oct 2, 2019, 03:51 AM

8. ok - I'll try to make my point clearer.

yup - read ur pm - ty.

b4 I got my inheritance that allowed me to buy this place in the boonies, I was living in an 18 foot trailer I had gobbed a 16x8 room on one side and put an old cook stove in there - no hydro or running water - yup TOTALLY off the grid - 45watts worth of solar panels mounted on a frame I built on an old office chair which I would rotate every hour or two to follow the sun, propane for a tiny fridge, and used scrap carbide plow blades to retain heat on top of a propane stovetop I located on the floor beside my crapper . . . . well yeah, that's where I really needed the heat the most.

Had an old 8 hp B&S generator, that I used on rare occasions, mostly to run power tools like my skill-saw

OH - no water hookup either, got water from town, collected rain from a couple of regular spots, dashed around with extra 20litre pails during a downpour, emptying them into the bathtub I had mounted on the rear of the trailer - yep - outside - bathed in the sunlight! Yep - melted lots of snow in the winter - it was pretty much a daily chore - a pot full of packed snow gets you about 1/4 pot of water, and it ain't speedy.

Just 2 car batteries for storage from the solar panels, and use was limited to lights and laptop - had 2 inverters - one 800a and one 400a - worked flawlessly.

The most efficient(cheapest) on a day to day cost was of course the solar, but high demand (like my skilsaw) required the more expensive, noisy and polluting genny.

I doubt we will ever be free from gas and coal in the foreseeable future, but I also see a future for wind and solar, as our ability to store energy gets more affordable.

Hydrogen cells may well be the answer to our storage issue - time will tell.

Sadly, I don't think my time left in this world is enuf to ever know . . . .

oh well - moving on - I just bought an old motorhome, which I intend to spend a considerable amount to restore it, and modify for my own needs - I'll be parking it right outside my ground floor apartment for the winter, putter away with it until Spring - get it legal for the road, then vacate my apartment freeing up 650 a month from my pension and return to my haven in the bush - full-time.

Long -range plan? - winter trips to the West Coast with it -

wish me luck!





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Response to akaConcernedCanuk (Reply #5)

Tue Oct 1, 2019, 09:13 PM

7. When government watermelons (green on the outside, red on the inside) mandate that you shall not run

your fossil fuel generator... then you shall understand. Their goal is to ban hydrocarbon energy (capitalism) to usher in their world socialist shit topia.

Wise up.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Thu Oct 3, 2019, 10:47 AM

9. What's the plan to store it to make it useful for Base Load?

All the power in the world is worthless unless it can be introduced into the grid at a steady, constant rate 24/7.

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Response to Aquila (Original post)

Thu Oct 3, 2019, 06:18 PM

10. Thats all the utility company will pay for it silly

That's about the same price Entergy pays customers for solar put out on the grid.

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