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Wed Dec 26, 2018, 07:14 PM

Pacific nations lose shortwave radio services that evade dictators, warn of natural disasters

The ABC has argued the shortwave transmissions, which can travel thousands of kilometres and be picked up by low-cost transmitters run on batteries or solar power, are outdated. Michael Mason, ABC’s Director of Radio said:


While shortwave technology has served audiences well for many decades, it is now nearly a century old and serves a very limited audience. The ABC is seeking efficiencies and will instead service this audience through modern technology.

The problem is, of course, that in remote places in the Pacific, particularly in Melanesian nations such as Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands, there is no access to an FM signal, limited internet and, where internet is available, it is expensive.

.....

How shortwave evades censors
The ABC has said it will replace international shortwave services with digital services including a web stream, in-country FM transmitters, an Australia Plus expats app and partner websites and apps such as TuneIn radio and vTurner.

There was no mention of the use of updates to shortwave technologies, such as Digital Radio Mondiale, which is being used by Radio New Zealand, or using shortwave for digital data transmission, which can’t be censored or jammed.

The move away from shortwave to FM transmissions and digital and mobile services has been accelerated despite the fact that FM frequencies can easily be shut down by disaffected political leaders, as happened in Fiji in 2009 on the order of then self-appointed Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama.

It was a matter of national pride at the time for the ABC to be providing independent information for Fijians via shortwave, with then managing director of the corporation, Mark Scott, highlighting a text message sent from inside Fiji to the ABC, which read “We are trying to listen to you online but are having difficulty. Please keep broadcasting. You are all we have”.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/theconversation.com/amp/pacific-nations-lose-shortwave-radio-services-that-evade-dictators-and-warn-of-natural-disasters-70058



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Reply Pacific nations lose shortwave radio services that evade dictators, warn of natural disasters (Original post)
wonderwarthog Dec 26 OP
His Daughter Dec 26 #1
wonderwarthog Dec 26 #2
Currentsitguy Dec 27 #3
oflguy Dec 28 #4
wonderwarthog Dec 28 #5

Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2018, 08:48 PM

1. The BBC has also seriously cut back on its shortwave services

Including to the US.

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Response to His Daughter (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 26, 2018, 09:40 PM

2. Almost all of them


are gone.

Damn you, internet!





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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Thu Dec 27, 2018, 07:41 AM

3. I suppose

There is still room for satellite, but I see a big niche for pirate radio there.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Fri Dec 28, 2018, 07:45 AM

4. Radio has been a tool to combat communism since at least 1961

I'm not sure if any of it was shortwave. I'm thinking some of it may have been.


"In 1961 Ochsner, with the financial help of Clint Murchison, established the Information Council of the Americas (INCA). Ed Butler was appointed as Executive Director of INCA. The main objective of the organization was to prevent communist revolutions in Latin America. Ochsner told the New Orleans States Item: "We must spread the warning of the creeping sickness of communism faster to Latin Americas, and to our own people, or Central and South America will be exposed to the same sickness as Cuba." (16th April, 1963)

"Edgar and Edith Stern, owners of WDSU radio and television, were members of INCA. Eustis Reily of the Reily Coffee Company personally donated thousands of dollars to INCA. However, it was Patrick J. Frawley, a Californian industrialist and close friend of Richard Nixon, who was INCA's largest financial contributor. The organization used some of this money to make a film about Fidel Castro entitled, Hitler in Havana. The New York Times reviewed the film calling it a "tasteless affront to minimum journalistic standards."

"One of Ochsner's friends described him as being "like a fundamentalist preacher in the sense that the fight against communism was the only subject that he would talk about, or even allow you to talk about, in his presence."

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Response to oflguy (Reply #4)

Fri Dec 28, 2018, 08:45 PM

5. ...




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