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Tue Jan 1, 2019, 10:09 PM

Key GOP lawmaker: Go after North Korea with sanctions and short-wave radio (2017)


WASHINGTON — House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce, R.-Calif., called Wednesday for tough new sanctions on Chinese banks that do business with North Korea. Royce also said the Stalinist regime in Pyongyang has been losing its totalitarian grip on a population increasingly getting information from short-wave radio and contraband South Korean movies.

Royce said in an interview with Yahoo News on Sirius XM POTUS Channel 124 that he had met with a top North Korean defector who played up the impact of communications from the outside world as a way to pressure the government of Kim Jong Un.


“He told me that the one thing really shaking the resolve of people across North Korea is the information that’s coming in on two short-wave run by defectors,” Royce said. “They’re telling people what’s really going on in North Korea and in the outside world.”

The defector, Royce recalled, said, “You should help amp that up and get that all across the country.”

Voice of America and Radio Free Asia — descendants of Cold War-era information warfare — currently broadcast 10 hours per day of short- and medium-wave radio into North Korea, according to a congressional aide. And Congress doubled their Korean-language programming for the year ending Oct. 1 to $6 million, where it will stay for the next fiscal year, the aide said.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/key-gop-lawmaker-go-north-korea-sanctions-short-wave-radio-112240529.html







10 replies, 101 views

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Reply Key GOP lawmaker: Go after North Korea with sanctions and short-wave radio (2017) (Original post)
wonderwarthog Jan 1 OP
quad489 Jan 1 #1
wonderwarthog Jan 1 #2
quad489 Jan 1 #3
wonderwarthog Jan 1 #4
Currentsitguy Jan 2 #5
wonderwarthog Jan 2 #6
Currentsitguy Jan 2 #7
wonderwarthog Jan 2 #8
Currentsitguy Jan 2 #9
wonderwarthog Jan 2 #10

Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Tue Jan 1, 2019, 10:19 PM

1. Thanks for the update from September 14, 2017..................

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Response to quad489 (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 1, 2019, 10:24 PM

2. ...





It says so in the header.

The purpose of the post was to point out the viability of shortwave as a policy tool in relation to the internet, which is far more easily blocked.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #2)

Tue Jan 1, 2019, 10:35 PM

3. Uh, haven't we been using radio broadcasts to convey policy messages since WWII...? And are we...

...suppose to believe that shortwave radio messages haven't been broadcasted into NK for decades now???

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Response to quad489 (Reply #3)

Tue Jan 1, 2019, 10:52 PM

4. We have.


However, shortwave broadcasters around the world have been shutting down because of inability to compete with the internet.

And you have this mentality...


"In 1999, Catharin Dalpino of the Brookings Institution, who served in the Clinton State Department as a deputy assistant secretary deputy for human rights, called Radio Free Asia "a waste of money." "Wherever we feel there is an ideological enemy, we're going to have a Radio Free Something," she says. Dalpino said she has reviewed scripts of Radio Free Asia's broadcasts and views the station's reporting as unbalanced. "They lean very heavily on reports by and about dissidents in exile. It doesn't sound like reporting about what's going on in a country. Often, it reads like a textbook on democracy, which is fine, but even to an American it's rather propagandistic."[29

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_Free_Asia

Amnesty International and others disagree...

"Awards Edit
min magazine's "Best of the Web". 2017 for "Best Multimedia Feature".
Sigma Delta Chi award. 2015. The Society of Professional Journalists.
Annual Human Rights Press Award. 2012, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, and 2000. Amnesty International, Hong Kong Journalists Association, Foreign Correspondents' Club, Hong Kong.
International Activist Award, 2005, Gleitsman Foundation.
Edward R. Murrow Regional Award, 2005, 2003, 2002, and 2001. Radio-Television News Directors Association.
New York Festivals radio awards named Radio Free Asia "Broadcaster of the Year" in 2009. RFA won one medal in 2015; one in 2014; two in 2013; one in 2012; one in 2011; two in 2010; seven in 2009; two in 2008; one in 2007; one in 2004; and one in 2000. New York Festivals.
Gracie Allen Award, 2013, 2010, and 2008. American Women in Radio and Television.
Consumer Rights award, 2008. Hong Kong Consumer Council, Hong Kong Journalists Association.
Society of Environmental Journalists, 2012 and 2010. Society of Environmental Journalists
Courage in Journalism Award, 2010. International Women's Media Foundation"


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_Free_Asia

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Response to wonderwarthog (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2019, 01:40 PM

5. Pretty hard to punch through the jammers


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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #5)

Wed Jan 2, 2019, 03:40 PM

6. Changing freqs often



might be a tactic.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #6)

Wed Jan 2, 2019, 04:03 PM

7. It might be, however...

How do you get the word out to the listeners without tipping off the government too quickly?

I would think a better strategy would be more transmitters on more frequencies than they have jamming equipment. That would probably work, but of course would be very expensive.

The other problem is that all radios (legally) sold in NK are set to fixed government frequencies. Now, of course receivers are being smuggled in from China, but buying and owning one is a risky proposition which can get you prison time or worse.

I'd be interested in the emerging concept of decentralized mesh networking anchored by some very large and highly situated data towers on the SK side. Raspberry Pi's are very small, easily concealable computers, about the size of a pack of cigarettes. With a specially adapted mesh wifi dongle, you could pretty easily leapfrog the internet pretty deep into NK, and it would damn near impossible to track down the source. The data speeds would be slow, but really how fast of a connection do you need to read a mobile text version of a basic news site, or Wikipedia?

Imagine a sort of Korean Project Gutenberg, with free texts of all the great political and philosophical works of the past few centuries. Heck, even some literature. 1984, Brave New World, Gulag Archipelago, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, hell even Ayn Rand's Anthem (the one where the protagonist discovers the concept of "I" in a collectivist totalitarian dystopia) would be great and revolutionary works to spread.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #7)

Wed Jan 2, 2019, 04:10 PM

8. Something gives me the feeling


you know more about this than you're telling us.








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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #8)

Wed Jan 2, 2019, 04:23 PM

9. We donate to a group

That currently is smuggling this kind of info in on thumb drives. They are, however, exploring what I proposed.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #9)

Wed Jan 2, 2019, 04:27 PM

10. Keep up the great work!



It is dangerous work for courageous people.


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