Techtechrcwrt

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 11:14 PM

China Says It Has Developed A New Radar System That Can Spot US Stealth Fighters At Incredible Dista

Ryan Pickrell 2 hrs ago

China has reportedly developed an over-the-horizon maritime early warning radar system that its creator claims can detect stealth aircraft far beyond visual range, an advanced capability that could threaten US fifth-generation fighters operating in the area.

Liu Yongtan, the team leader for the radar project, told Chinese media that his high-frequency surface wave radar emits "high frequency electromagnetic waves with long wavelengths and wide beams" that travel along the service of the sea, the Global Times reported Monday, citing a recent interview with Naval and Merchant Ships magazine.

The radar system, part of China's ongoing efforts to prevent a sneak attack by enemy stealth assets, can purportedly detect enemy air and naval threats hundreds of kilometers away in any weather condition.

The 83-year-old creator says the radar is also "immune" to anti-radiation missiles, which track the point of origin for electromagnetic waves.

Liu's radar system, which won him the country's highest scientific award, has been named China's "first line of defense."

Does it actually work?

Western experts argue that this type of radar, which is not new technology, offers the defending country a chance against incoming stealth assets, but there are limitations that prevent it from being the death of a fifth-generation fighter like the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter.

Read more: China could be a far more formidable US rival than the Soviet Union ever was

"Because of its very long wavelengths, it can detect objects like stealthy aircraft," Todd Harrison, an aerospace expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies told Business Insider, explaining that stealthy aircraft are designed to be less detectable to shortwave radar.

Major drawbacks, however, include the low resolution and lack of a real-time target-grade track. "It will tell you there's something there, but you can't characterize it," Harrison explained, adding that the radar "can't get a precise enough fix on a position to target it."

Justin Bronk, an air combat expert at the Royal United Services Institute told Business Insider that "China might be better informed about where American stealth fighters are operating in the battle space, but still unable to use those radar systems to cue in missiles to actually kill them."

But, the over-the-horizon radar does have the ability to cue other types of radar systems to narrow their field of view and concentrate their radar energy on the position where an object was detected. "You have a better chance of finding it" with the over-the-horizon radar, Harrison explained.

More...

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/china-says-it-has-developed-a-new-radar-system-that-can-spot-us-stealth-fighters-at-incredible-distances/ar-AACJJSs#page=2

11 replies, 120 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply China Says It Has Developed A New Radar System That Can Spot US Stealth Fighters At Incredible Dista (Original post)
RCW2014 Tuesday OP
Duke Lacrosse Wednesday #1
rampartb Wednesday #2
def_con5 Wednesday #4
fools_gold Wednesday #5
Duke Lacrosse Wednesday #6
fools_gold Wednesday #7
His Daughter Wednesday #8
fools_gold Wednesday #11
Duke Lacrosse Wednesday #9
fools_gold Wednesday #10
Gunslinger201 Wednesday #3

Response to RCW2014 (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:46 AM

1. High frequency plus long wavelengths does not compute.

Something has been lost in translation.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #1)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 04:42 AM

2. good catch

λf=c : the higher the frequency, the shorter the wave length

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #1)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 08:10 AM

4. I suspect they mean amplitude not frequency

Ina y case it's not new, it might work well with other radars to detect stealthy aircraft.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #1)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 08:51 AM

5. No, they're talking high frequency (3-30 MHz) OTH radar

Like the article says, this is not new technology. In the radar world, the high frequency spectrum (3-30 MHz) is a much longer relative wavelength than the UHF (300-3000 MHZ) and microwave frequencies normally used by radar.

For example, the Patriot air defense system surveillance radar is a C-band radar operating at 4-8 GHz, with a wavelength of 3.75 - 7 cm. (About 2 inches.) An over the horizon radar operating in the high frequency (HF) spectrum, for example, 7 MHz, would have a wavelength of 40 meters, much longer than the 0.03 meter of the Patriot radar.

So, their use of "high" frequency and "long" wavelength is relative to the more normal radars.

Hope I explained that OK.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to fools_gold (Reply #5)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 09:53 AM

6. Thanks for the explanation, makes sense.

A radar like that would be pretty easy to detect and take out.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #6)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 10:18 AM

7. Actually, they are harder to take out

Although they are high powered and relatively easy to receive and guide to the general target area, the vagaries of HF propagation present some guidance issues in the cruise part of the mission. Where it really gets difficult is the propagation and near field/far field effects as it enters the terminal guidance phase. It's difficult to do terminal guidance into the target if you only have a general idea of the location. OTOH, most of the OTH radars are big, permanent installations and their locations are precisely known so you can rely on GPS and/or inertial guidance for terminal phase.

ETA: To clarify, I meant that they are harder to electronically acquire and fully guide to target than a regular radar. However, if you already know where it is (and we generally do, from other assets) they are easy to destroy.

In a previous life I used to worry about this stuff.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to fools_gold (Reply #7)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 11:46 AM

8. Inherent in the physics are large non-mobile arrays and fixed targets are easy to hit.

However, OTH systems are strategic/national assets and would be well defended by tactical level SAMs. Taking it out could take a bit, barring some super weapon that can bypass the layered defenses. However even the old Tomahawks could do it, particularly in a saturation raid.

OTH also has limitations in terms of target positioning. They are more of an "over there" kind of system vice precision targeting since it is not a direct sensing approach.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to His Daughter (Reply #8)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 04:27 PM

11. True

I was looking at it from the design of an autonomous seeker homing in on the source of the radiation, like a HARM.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to fools_gold (Reply #7)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 03:46 PM

9. Use a big enough munition, and aim is not an issue.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #9)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 04:21 PM

10. True Dat!

But we always tried to be cost effective when designing systems. Still, there is a great deal of satisfaction in a big bang!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RCW2014 (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 06:02 AM

3. Wrens and Sparrows

Which one is the F-35?



F-117’s had a Radar return about the size of a Hawk. That was 20 years ago

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Techtechrcwrt