Techairconditioningdiydoityourselfsummercooling

Tue May 27, 2014, 08:04 AM

DIY Homemade Air Conditioner- "The 5 Gallon Bucket" A/C - can be solar powered!



Published on Aug 18, 2013 by desertsun02

How to make a non-compressor based "5 gallon bucket" air conditioner. simple DIY. items needed: bucket, styrofoam liner, pvc pipe, small fan, and ice. (small solar panel is optional). one frozen gallon jug of water lasted 6 hours. temperature in house was 84F. cooled air was in the mid. 40F range.

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Reply DIY Homemade Air Conditioner- "The 5 Gallon Bucket" A/C - can be solar powered! (Original post)
Spookie Spook May 2014 OP
Scary Red May 2014 #1
oflguy Nov 2018 #11
Woman On Fire May 2014 #2
Duke Lacrosse May 2014 #3
Spookie Spook May 2014 #4
Duke Lacrosse May 2014 #5
jasonnc Nov 2018 #8
Duke Lacrosse Nov 2018 #9
LavenderGirl Nov 2018 #10
Duke Lacrosse Nov 2018 #15
LavenderGirl Nov 2018 #16
Duke Lacrosse Nov 2018 #18
LavenderGirl Nov 2018 #20
oflguy Nov 2018 #14
TexMexNext Nov 2018 #22
Duke Lacrosse Nov 2018 #23
oflguy Nov 2018 #12
LavenderGirl Nov 2018 #17
Duke Lacrosse Nov 2018 #19
oflguy Nov 2018 #21
RocRizzo May 2014 #6
oflguy Nov 2018 #13
SweetHouse Mar 2018 #7

Response to Spookie Spook (Original post)

Tue May 27, 2014, 08:13 AM

1. Very cool...

it does take power to freeze the water, but this thing could be very useful.

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Response to Scary Red (Reply #1)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 11:09 AM

11. "it does take power to freeze the water"

Not if you live next to a frozen lake or a glacier where you can cut free blocks of ice and put them in the vacuum cleaner (as long as you don't count the gasoline you used in the chain saw)

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Response to Spookie Spook (Original post)

Tue May 27, 2014, 08:59 AM

2. I'm glad I clicked the video

the streamers looked like water, I thought it was spraying water all over the carpet. I might try this myself!

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Response to Spookie Spook (Original post)

Tue May 27, 2014, 06:38 PM

3. If the ice is made by a freezer inside of the structure to be cooled by the A/C...

...the net result would be to make the place warmer.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #3)

Tue May 27, 2014, 07:01 PM

4. Yo Einstein-

My freezer is in the kitchen, and the cold air blowing out of the buckets is ~30 degrees below the ambient air in my living room. The freezer is going to work whether I have a gallon of water in there or not

You know, it's becoming tedious to post just about anywhere anymore.
Common sense has left the building.

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Response to Spookie Spook (Reply #4)

Tue May 27, 2014, 07:09 PM

5. I'll overlook the snarky Einstein reference. Temperature and heat are not the same thing.

Your freezer makes ice by removing heat from water. That process is less than 100% efficient.

All of the heat removed from the ice, and some more heat due to inefficiency of your freezer, are released into your kitchen through the coils of your freezer. That warms up your domicile MORE than your improvised cooler can possibly cool it.

You may be making one room or part of a room more comfortable temporarily, but in the long run your place will end up warmer than it would if you hadn't made ice in the first place. Your freezer has to do more work when it has to make ice in addition to keeping your supply of TV dinners frozen.

ETA put your freezer outside, or buy bagged ice instead of making it, and you'll actually cool your place down.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #5)

Fri Nov 2, 2018, 03:01 PM

8. This is a good point

Also who needs air conditioning when you could just have a fan. Ceiling fan installation can be very easy and cost efficient.

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Response to jasonnc (Reply #8)

Fri Nov 2, 2018, 03:10 PM

9. I installed a whole house fan in my home this summer.

It does a much better job of making my house comfortable in the evening and at night than two small window A/C units, and uses about 1/3 the power.

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Response to jasonnc (Reply #8)

Fri Nov 2, 2018, 04:34 PM

10. It really depends upon where you live

If you live in the desert southwest where summer temps can get to 120 degrees, ceiling fans alone just won't cut it.

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Response to LavenderGirl (Reply #10)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 07:26 PM

15. You are right. The whole house fan works very well where I live, which is San Diego, CA...

...because the outside air in the evening is almost always cooler than the interior of a home at that time.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #15)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 08:28 PM

16. San Diego is my dream location

I'd move there in a heartbeat if I could. I envy you!

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Response to LavenderGirl (Reply #16)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 08:36 PM

18. Housing is ridiculously expensive here. If I didn't already own my home, I couldn't afford...

...even to rent it.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #18)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 08:44 PM

20. Yes, that's why we don't move there

I have to settle for a trip there once or twice a year.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #5)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 12:01 PM

14. This is why supermarkets in the South locate their cooler condensers outside

Its hot enough in the Summer already without adding more heat in the store with indoor condensers.

Up north, that additional heat comes in handy in Winter.

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Response to Duke Lacrosse (Reply #5)

Sun Nov 4, 2018, 11:28 PM

22. I use these in my deer blind in October

Who cares about inefficiency when the goal is to survive 90 degrees with 90% humidity for 3-4 hours in a hot box while hunting? I use a igloo ice chest with a fan.

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Response to TexMexNext (Reply #22)

Mon Nov 5, 2018, 12:25 AM

23. Is the freezer that you use to make the ice also in your deer blind?

If not, then it's a perfectly good way to keep your deer blind more comfortable.

RIF

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Response to Spookie Spook (Reply #4)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 11:33 AM

12. Um, Einstein

If you put a container of water in your freezer to freeze it, your refrigerator has to work extra hard to freeze it.

The formula is:

Heat of rejection (via the condenser coil on the refrigeration system) equals

The heat of absorption (the heat removed from the water to turn it into ice), PLUS (and here is the rub)

the heat of compression. (which is the conversion of electrical energy used to run the compressor into mechanical energy to drive the piston in the compressor, which becomes heat energy, which is added to the refrigerant as you compress it. This heat is added to the heat of absorption, which is what the refrigerator accumulated in the evaporator coil as it cooled the water. All that heat must be rejected in the condensing coil. (the heat of rejection).

So, in the process of freezing the additional ice, you have warmed up your kitchen with heat which is the product of the heat from the water plus the added heat from the electricity used to make the ice.

Remember, your refrigerator does not run continuously. It has a thermostat that shuts off the refrigeration system when the refrigerator is cold enough.

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Response to oflguy (Reply #12)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 08:30 PM

17. The person you are replying to hasn't been here in over 4 years

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Response to LavenderGirl (Reply #17)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 08:37 PM

19. It's OK, that person is ignorant.

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Response to LavenderGirl (Reply #17)

Sun Nov 4, 2018, 09:40 AM

21. And?

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Response to Spookie Spook (Original post)

Wed May 28, 2014, 04:05 PM

6. More like what we used to call

a "swamp cooler."
We used to make them with old coolers and blocks of ice though.
My grandmother had a nice store bought one. You fill it up with ice water, and a fan spews out cold air for a few hours.

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Response to RocRizzo (Reply #6)

Sat Nov 3, 2018, 11:55 AM

13. Swamp coolers work where there is very little humidity in the air.

Swamp coolers work on the principal of evaporative cooling, a process known as adiabatic, whereby there is no heat removed from or added to the water. Psychrometrically, the process neither loses nor gains heat. It involves a tradeoff of water temperature and moisture content, resulting in no loss or gain of enthalpy, or heat content.

The result, in dry, arid air, is cooler air with an acceptable increase in humidity. This is why they are not acceptable as comfort coolers in humid air. The more humid the air is, the less efficient the process and additional humidity in the air makes it uncomfortable to humans.

In humid locations, it is better to simply blow air over the ice.

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Response to Spookie Spook (Original post)

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