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Thu Nov 15, 2018, 07:11 AM

Samsung unveils next-generation 8nm Exynos silicon

Samsung has unveiled the next-gen chips that will power its smartphones and tablets (and crypto-miners). And it hopes others will use them too.

The Exynos 9 has been built on Samsung's own 8nm fabrication processes, and the first two chips in the series are the 9810 and 9820.

The latter has a 2x4 core, with two fast (Cortex A-75) and four background (Cortex A-55) Arm cores at its heart.

Then there are another two custom cores incorporating several features – an integrated LTE modem capable of 2Gbit/s (Category 20 with 4x4 MIMO support) and a Mali-G76 GPU.

The new chip can process 8K video at 30fps. Samsung introduced 8K tellies this year. 4K UHD video is now captured at 150fps. The GPU can drive up to a 4K UHD (4096 x 2160) display.

Of more interest to professionals is the PUF (physically unclonable function) security zone for crypto-key storage, something typically found in smartcards or specialist silicon, usually FPGAs. Each PUF has a unique identifier. Samsung has previously built a PUF into its IoT chips such as the i T200.

And inevitably there's a "Neural Processing Unit" because... because artificial intelligence.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/11/14/exynos9_chips/

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Response to Troll2 (Original post)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 07:25 AM

1. My, things have certainly changed

since I went to Basic Electronics school back in 1968.

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Response to Bob the Bilderberger (Reply #1)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 08:03 AM

2. At least you probably never studied vacuum tube circuits

I remember that in the early '90s we projected that digital video on PCs would be possible when semiconductors hit the 135 nm node, although that may have been at 320 x 240 pixels.

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Response to Troll2 (Reply #2)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 08:21 AM

3. My first electronics school was in '62 and was tube-heavy while including the then-new solid...

... state devices AND the ferrite-core main-frame computer memory array. Two years later in the USAF, the 42 week tech school was pretty much a repeat, as the first equipment courses which were then included were tube-type secure communication devices, neither of which did I actually work with upon graduation...

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #3)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 09:13 AM

4. Early minicomputers also used ferrite-core memory, e.g. the DEC PDP-8 and HP 2114

IIRC, the second generation of minis switched to semiconductor memory around 1970.

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Response to Troll2 (Reply #4)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 10:40 AM

5. The RCA course I attended led up to the RCA 501 mainframe computer which had, as I recall, a...

... ferrite-core memory about 2.5 cubic feet in size. Decades later I learned that that was the computer that had been used at the BMEWS site where I had worked for RCA Service Company as a truck driver to earn the money pre '62, a portion of which I later gave to RCA for my year of schooling!...

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #5)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 03:03 PM

6. Maybe it was in use later than you's expect

I looked up the CDC-1700 and found this:

"Another was used as Maintenance and Diagnostic SubSystem (M&DSS) for the AN/FPQ-16 Perimeter Acquisition Radar Attack Characterization System (PARCS), located at Cavalier Air Force Station (CAFS) in North Dakota; this CDC 1700 is still being used as of this writing (2016)."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CDC_1700

This was originally for the Safeguard ABM system.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalier_Air_Force_Station

I wonder how they keep it running.

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Response to Troll2 (Reply #6)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 03:12 PM

7. RCA was the Prime Contractor on BMEWS, working on a "cost-plus" basis which meant the...

… more they spent, the more they made. I expect RCA made the most of that, while it lasted, updating equipment (especially RCA product) whenever they could...


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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #7)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 03:29 PM

8. Providing special order spares for manufacture discontinued systems can be lucrative too

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Response to Troll2 (Reply #8)

Thu Nov 15, 2018, 06:08 PM

9. One system I was trained on a year after the USAF tech school and that I later TAUGHT at the...

… school after I returned from Vietnam and was chosen for instructor duty, was initially put out to pasture, BUT as it was a command telephone encryption system which sat in a safe in important offices, there was blowback. For something like three more years, the systems were kept running by cannibalizing units which were returned to depot and were stored in a bunker on a brushy area of Lackland or thereabouts.

I was told that when someone from depot had to go there to track down a needed part, they had to be alert for tarantulas and rattlesnakes and such, nesting in the dark relative coolness...



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