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Thu May 29, 2014, 05:12 AM

Study Shows Why Stress Triggers Depression In Some, Resilience In Others

There’s a group of neurons in the front of the brain – in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) – that seems to be strongly linked to depression. Interestingly, this area of the brain is also known as the “me-center” of the brain – that is, cells in the area are active when you’re thinking about yourself, worrying about the future, worrying about your life, and day-dreaming. It’s part of the default mode network, which is just “on” when your mind isn’t doing anything besides wandering about. It’s no surprise then that this area, the mPFC, is highly active in people who are depressed – since ruminating, worrying, and generally catastrophizing about one’s life are central symptoms of depression.

But a team from Cold Spring Harbor wanted to see whether activity in the mPFC actually leads to depression or whether there’s some other mechanism at play. So they stressed out mice by shocking their paws at random intervals and not providing a way out. Psychology fans will recognize this as the “learned helplessness” model of depression: When the mice are later given a method of escape, some don’t even bother to take it – these are the “depressed” ones. Humans are very similar in that about 20% of people just shut down in response to repeated stress.

Says author Bo Li, “a subset of the mice, about 20%, will passively endure the shock. This helpless behavior is quite similar to what clinicians see in depressed individuals – an inability to take action to avoid or correct a difficult situation. Our work is focused on understanding why 20% of mice become depressed – just like why some people become depressed in response to stress while the majority of people do not.”

It turned out, in the new study, that the subset of mice who exhibited the signs of depression had much greater activity in their mPFCs. Mice without depressive symptoms didn’t show this change in their brains.

More:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2014/05/28/brain-study-shows-why-stress-triggers-depression-in-certain-people/

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Reply Study Shows Why Stress Triggers Depression In Some, Resilience In Others (Original post)
Let it go May 2014 OP
steelysunshine May 2014 #1
galileosghost May 2014 #2
Post removed Jul 2016 #3

Response to Let it go (Original post)

Thu May 29, 2014, 05:48 AM

1. I think we need to rethink the whole model for treating depression.

Depression of course is no fun. But, there are benefits. This article doesn't go into the causes of depression so much. But, if the cause of depression is a domestic situation depression can be life saving. Case in point a child that is constantly yelled at by their parents may develop depression. It's a good thing because speaking up to the parent and fighting back can lead to serious injury. But, I digress this article explains how depression can help with analytical skills.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/depressions-evolutionary/

My advice would be a multifaceted appoach. Find out what kind of dysfunction the individual is dealing with, teach them writing exercises and meditation, encourage exercise (some studies say it's in effective, but it can't hurt), boost b vitamins.


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Response to steelysunshine (Reply #1)

Thu May 29, 2014, 06:14 AM

2. biomechanics ARE god :) nt

 

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