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Sat Feb 25, 2017, 01:39 PM

What about intersex and androgyny?

There's the Bem Sex-Role Inventory to see where you fit on scale of sexual identity-- it's a bell curve that can skew either way.

But, more interesting is intersex, where the baby arrives with remnants of both sexes. Rarely with complete sex organs of both sexes, but sometimes ovaries and testes, or ovaries and a penis.

Historically, doctors have lopped off the penis because it was easier, but there are those unpredictable hormonal changes no matter what you do.

And hormonal imbalance in "normal" kids has its effects.

And then there's androgyny-- with no primary sex organs, but who knows what hormonal stew?

It's never that simple, is it?

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Reply What about intersex and androgyny? (Original post)
Scary Red Feb 2017 OP
TM999 Feb 2017 #1
rampartb Feb 2017 #2
TM999 Feb 2017 #3
rampartb Feb 2017 #4
TM999 Feb 2017 #5
rampartb Feb 2017 #6
oflguy Mar 2017 #7

Response to Scary Red (Original post)

Sat Feb 25, 2017, 01:54 PM

1. 'Androgyny' is a social psychology theory.

https://www.pop.org/content/androgyny-hoax

Actual instances of biological intersex is measure as no more than 4% of any general population of a country. That is such a minority overall of the human population that it does not warrant such an over the top response currently in 'modern' pop psychological theory.

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Response to TM999 (Reply #1)

Sat Feb 25, 2017, 02:05 PM

2. 4% sounds high for children who identify as the opposite sex

i suppose there are a lot of "tom boys" and a few "sissies" in every school, but actual full on transgender can not be very common.

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Response to rampartb (Reply #2)

Sat Feb 25, 2017, 02:14 PM

3. This isn't identification statistics.

Those are bluntly made up by adults.

These are actual biological instances of intersex at birth. And it is typically around .005% in the general population up to 4% in some instances.

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Response to TM999 (Reply #3)

Sat Feb 25, 2017, 03:13 PM

4. i won't argue the numbers

i'm sure that it is greater than zero but not very large.

i've been told that the frontier doctors and midwives of the19th century west would consider these conditions (along with extra toes, webbed feet, downs, siamese etc as "monstrosities" and would solemnly report to the parents that the child was stillborn and "there was nothing we could do."

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Response to rampartb (Reply #4)

Sat Feb 25, 2017, 03:26 PM

5. Well we have come a long way in medicine since then.

But now social psychology, biases, and activism control far too much of what is called science.

"It's worrying because replication is supposed to be a hallmark of scientific integrity," says Dr Errington.

Concern over the reliability of the results published in scientific literature has been growing for some time.

According to a survey published in the journal Nature last summer, more than 70% of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist's experiments.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-39054778?SThisFB

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Response to TM999 (Reply #5)

Sat Feb 25, 2017, 04:20 PM

6. failure to replicate results is a result

and a valuable part of the peer review process.

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Response to Scary Red (Original post)

Thu Mar 23, 2017, 07:09 AM

7. Says who?

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