Healthhealth

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 12:21 AM

the disappearing $3,000

Every month, I receive a statement from my medical insurance, telling me that the hospital billed them $7,000 for that month, and the insurance company in turn paid the hospital $4,000.

Approximate figures.

But then when I come to that dreaded "customer share of the bill" column, it's always $0.

For which I'm extremely grateful, of course, but I wonder what sort of game is being played here. Is the hospital trying to pull a fast one, overcharging in hopes that the insurance company won't notice (but they do)?

9 replies, 391 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply the disappearing $3,000 (Original post)
imwithfred Oct 2018 OP
rampartb Oct 2018 #1
imwithfred Oct 2018 #2
rampartb Oct 2018 #3
orson Oct 2018 #4
rampartb Oct 2018 #5
orson Oct 2018 #7
Currentsitguy Oct 2018 #6
orson Oct 2018 #8
Currentsitguy Oct 2018 #9

Response to imwithfred (Original post)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 05:09 AM

1. the hospital has a contract with your insurance company

that insurance price is negotiated between the medical associations, hospital corporations, and insurance companies, each of which is a shareholder of the others with representation on their boards of directors. their goal has nothing to do with saving your $3k, but in maximizing, over all of their holdings, the amount they can squeeze out of each of us.

if you want to call that $3k part of their marketing budget, the incentive we have to pay insurance premiums and take part in the game, then that is probably close.

how much do you pay for flu shots?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to rampartb (Reply #1)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 06:22 AM

2. Thank you; I had totally utterly forgotten all about this "negotiated price" thing.

I have no idea why; I just forgot.

I don't pay anything for influenza shots, or for prescription drugs, or other medical services. Being in hospice--I dunno if this is universal, though--all medical expenses are covered by a set monthly fee, which is that $7,000 or $4,000 (it varies by a few bucks every month, depending upon how many days in a month).

It seems a good deal, and to some extent it is, but at the same time one has to realize that in accepting it, one has surrendered all health and medical decisions to another person or entity. So it's a mixed bag.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to imwithfred (Reply #2)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 07:00 AM

3. not quite hospice

but i have been shuffled between haspital, acute care, rehab facility, with a bit of home health and home iv therapy since april. without medicare and blue cross i would be homeless and still have an infected broken toe that they are going to take off anyway, after, of course, more tests.

flu shots attracted my interest this year, (100th anniversary of the deadly spanish flu). incredible research (taxpayer funded) goes into each year's flu shot, which is essentially free to everyone with insurance. which i'm sure the actuaries have determined saves plenty of dollars for the insurance companies.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to rampartb (Reply #3)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 08:56 AM

4. I was a happier man

when I was only vaguely aware of my toes. Foot infections are the pits, and hard as the devil to get rid of. You think you're clear and they flare up again. I've become diligent about foot care. Lopping off body parts is something I'd rather avoid.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to orson (Reply #4)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 09:32 AM

5. last 4 years (i'm 66) have been 1 foot or the other

these modern iv antibiotics are the reason i still have feet. i was prepared to lose the toe in july, and i wish they had taken it then.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to rampartb (Reply #5)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 12:21 PM

7. Our feet don't heal well

as we age, especially if you're diabetic or have neuropathy. I developed an ulcer on my heel when I was about your age. I'm 78 now and it's just been one damned thing after another. I quit booze and dropped some weight or i'd likely be dead by now. it's a few years since i was last hospitalized but I still wrestle with neuropathy and recurring infections in one toe. It sucks, but so far I prefer it to the alternative

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to orson (Reply #4)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 12:08 PM

6. Type1 diabetic

The thought of loosing toes or feet terrifies me. It's why I am a carb counting NAZI.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #6)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 12:22 PM

8. Amen, brother

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to orson (Reply #8)

Wed Oct 3, 2018, 12:25 PM

9. It's the one thing that if I am accused of Nazism, I will wholeheartedly agree.

Toes, feet, and the more manly bits are things I'd like to keep and function.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Healthhealth