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Sat Dec 8, 2018, 09:55 PM

Lets talk about bone spurs

On September 17, 1968 - Trump's 1-Y classification came a month after Trump underwent an “Armed Forces Physical Examination,” according to Selective Service records, which note the results of the exam as “DISQ.” While the military records do not further detail why Trump was granted the 1-Y deferment, a 1992 biography of the businessman by journalist Wayne Barrett reported that Trump received a medical deferment following the September 17, 1968 exam. He was diagnosed with bone spurs in his heels.

1968, October 15 - Three months later, on October 15, his classification was switched to 1-Y, which was given to men deemed qualified for military service “only in time of national emergency.”

People that hate Trump seem to hold Trumps bone spurs against him like a personal grudge. Did Trump have them surgically implanted in his feet?

Since when do these people think the military accepted people that needed surgery?......oh wait......(on feet, I mean)

During WWII, my father was turned down by the military because he was diagnosed during a military medical examination as having high arches. It makes sense. A soldier's feet are perhaps his most important physical asset. I'm no podiatrist, but it seems to me bone spurs are a lot more important to a soldier's physical being than high arches.

It turns out, my father wanted to join so badly (everybody did then) he weaseled his way in anyway. He would never tell us how he did it though.


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Arrow 37 replies Author Time Post
Reply Lets talk about bone spurs (Original post)
oflguy Dec 2018 OP
freedumb2003 Dec 2018 #1
freedumb2003 Dec 2018 #2
wonderwarthog Dec 2018 #3
oflguy Dec 2018 #4
wonderwarthog Dec 2018 #9
batcat Dec 2018 #5
oflguy Dec 2018 #6
batcat Dec 2018 #7
oflguy Dec 2018 #13
batcat Dec 2018 #15
MumblyPeg Dec 2018 #8
batcat Dec 2018 #10
MumblyPeg Dec 2018 #12
wonderwarthog Dec 2018 #11
batcat Dec 2018 #14
wonderwarthog Dec 2018 #20
batcat Dec 2018 #25
Gamle-ged Dec 2018 #16
batcat Dec 2018 #19
wonderwarthog Dec 2018 #21
Gamle-ged Dec 2018 #22
wonderwarthog Dec 2018 #23
Currentsitguy Dec 2018 #29
batcat Dec 2018 #30
Squeek Dec 2018 #17
oflguy Dec 2018 #18
wonderwarthog Dec 2018 #24
Badsamm Dec 2018 #26
RATFINK_5.0 Dec 2018 #27
oflguy Dec 2018 #28
RATFINK_5.0 Feb 2019 #31
oflguy Feb 2019 #32
FreeWheelBurning Mar 2019 #33
oflguy Mar 2019 #34
FreeWheelBurning Mar 2019 #35
oflguy Mar 2019 #36
FreeWheelBurning Mar 2019 #37

Response to oflguy (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:07 PM

1. They also make fun of his Rosacea

 

https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/rosacea

Overviewrosacea_landing.jpg
Rosacea: Left untreated, rosacea can get worse.
ROSACEA: OVERVIEW
Rosacea (rose-AY-sha) is a common skin disease. It often begins with a tendency to blush or flush more easily than other people.

The redness can slowly spread beyond the nose and cheeks to the forehead and chin. Even the ears, chest, and back can be red all the time.

Rosacea can cause more than redness. There are so many signs and symptoms that rosacea has four subtypes:

Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea: Redness, flushing, visible blood vessels.
Papulopustular rosacea: Redness, swelling, and acne-like breakouts.
Phymatous rosacea: Skin thickens and has a bumpy texture.
Ocular rosacea: Eyes red and irritated, eyelids can be swollen, and person may have what looks like a sty.

With time, people who have rosacea often see permanent redness in the center of their face.

Famous faces of rosacea
If you are living with rosacea, you are in good company. Some famous people have struggled with rosacea:

Bill Clinton
Diana, Princess of Wales
W.C. Fields (a film star in the 1920s and 1930s)

You can include President Trump to that list.

Only a lefty would find it OK to mock someone's medical condition - one with no cure.

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Response to oflguy (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:08 PM

2. asshole lefty will NOT show up on this thread

 

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Response to oflguy (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:09 PM

3. Your Father


obviously put country over self.



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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #3)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:23 PM

4. During WWII everybody wanted to fight Germans and the invading Japanese

Young men were lying about their age to join the military.

It was quite different during Vietnam. It was dubbed the TV war. Somehow, images coming back home fighting a guerrilla war against the Vietnamese in jungles and swamps did not hold the same fascination for young men as did the hedgerows of France or the deserts of Africa. The atrocity perpetuated against our boys at Pearl Harbor gave Americans a much clearer vision of retribution than Johnson's "fighting Communism rally cry."

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Response to oflguy (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:36 PM

9. Agree 100%.

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Response to oflguy (Original post)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:26 PM

5. My father enlisted in the army in WWI but he was underage. ...

My grandmother chased him down and pulled him out. He did get a chance to fire a machine gun before she arrived.

He was too old to join for WWII. He was working as an insurance investigator and his company loaned him out to Navel Intelligence. He investigated spy rings in the Pittsburgh Pa. area and did background checks on scientists being considered for work on the Manhattan Project.

He and his partner accidentally cornered a German spy in a warehouse and the spy shot at them. The object was to let to cops arrest the spies but they screwed up somehow. Fortunately no one was shot in the altercation.

The cops would sometimes noticed my father was driving a lot and would pull him over as there was gas rationing during the war. He would show them his ID and continue on.

I joined the Air Force during the Vietnam era as I was going to be drafted into the Army the next month. My mother had a friend on the draft board who passed along that info. I was stationed stateside during my time in the service so I really don’t have any good war stories to tell my grandkids. My father who never made it out of boot camp had better war stories than I do.

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Response to batcat (Reply #5)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:29 PM

6. You made a wise choice

As a retired Air Force Colonel once told me, "There is no experience like the Army experience."

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Response to oflguy (Reply #6)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:35 PM

7. I did learn a trade in the Air Force that led to a career that enabled me to retire just before ...

I turned 60. I have no complaints about my time in the Air Force and fond memories of it.

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Response to batcat (Reply #7)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:43 PM

13. So did my brother

He married at 17 and his wife had to get her parent's permission as she was 16. She had medical problems so my brother joined the Air Force for the medical coverage.

He learned a trade that propelled him to a lucrative career also.

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Response to oflguy (Reply #13)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:52 PM

15. In those days a tour of duty in the Air Force could work out better than going to ...

college today. Employers had no problem hiring military vets with a trade back then.

The same thing might still apply today. If you go to college you get brainwashed by liberal professors but if you join the Air Force you learn a lot more about how things work in the real world.

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Response to batcat (Reply #5)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:36 PM

8. this was pretty common the way I understand it.

Listening to my grandpa tell the stories the way it was, NOT joining up to go over in WW II was shameful. Nobody wanted to the be guy who stayed home. Grandpa even forged a birth certificate to get in underage, which was also quite common the way I hear.

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Response to MumblyPeg (Reply #8)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:39 PM

10. People who lived though those days are often called the Greatest Generation. ...

In my opinion that is an accurate description.

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Response to batcat (Reply #10)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:41 PM

12. they most certainly were. hell, I'm embarrassed to even be part of my own generation...

bunch of worthless ass, self-centered, mentally deficient lazy asshats

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Response to batcat (Reply #5)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:40 PM

11. Fortunate!


My best friend did the same in 71.

He was sent to Thailand as an Air Commando, flying over the Ho Chi Minh trail in Laos.


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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #11)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 10:45 PM

14. If I would have re-enlisted I was told I would have been sent to ...

Korat AFB in Thailand. My wife at the time told me that if I re-enlisted she would divorce me.

I made what was probably a bad choice and decided to leave the Air Force.

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Response to batcat (Reply #14)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 05:07 PM

20. Maybe not



My buddy got shot at a lot with 37mm aa and got full disability for ptsd.


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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #20)

Mon Dec 10, 2018, 01:26 AM

25. I guess I was fortunate in many ways. (n/t)

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Response to batcat (Reply #5)

Sat Dec 8, 2018, 11:34 PM

16. I didn't have anyone in the draft board but I DID have a friend who was a month older than me. We...

… got our notices that we would soon be called for our draft physicals, and he was called two weeks earlier than me. He passed his physical and I watched. ONE WEEK LATER he got his "Greetings" in the mail. I talked to an Air Force recruiter, took the tests and was guaranteed an electronics career field, as I was already working in electronics on Wall Street. I passed my physical and enlisted, eventually making a 20-year career of it...

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #16)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 01:18 AM

19. I learned electronics in the Air Force and used my training to get a good job in the ...

aerospace industry. Put in 37 years with one major company and retired.

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #16)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 05:08 PM

21. The tech training


doesn't get any better than the Air Force.

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Response to wonderwarthog (Reply #21)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 07:11 PM

22. Had a 42-week tech school at Lackland after basic there. I phased ahead a bit, bypassing some of...

.. the basic electronics elements, but not TOO much ahead as there was a first stripe in the offing for graduating a tech school with some minimum number of weeks actually in class. I didn't suspect that a little over five years later, after reenlisting in Vietnam, I'd be back at Lackland, tapped for a controlled-tour of instructor duty which eventually added up to a bit over nine of my twenty years in service...

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Response to Gamle-ged (Reply #22)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 11:47 PM

23. Holy crap!


THAT is pretty damn impressive!

I am aware the level of training is far beyond what any civilian school can offer.

Thanks for your service!


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Response to batcat (Reply #5)

Thu Dec 13, 2018, 11:15 AM

29. My grandfather was also too old

But without him, and others like him, we could not have won the war. He was a track foreman for the Pennsylvania Railroad at the Conway Yard, which was the primary rail yard for Pittsburgh. Without them the materials for steel and the finished product and equipment would have never made it to the various Theaters of the war.

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Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #29)

Thu Dec 13, 2018, 02:37 PM

30. The greatest generation did one hell of a good job. (n/t)

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Response to oflguy (Original post)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 12:58 AM

17. Poor little Donnie...

"People that hate Trump seem to hold Trumps bone spurs against him like a personal grudge. Did Trump have them surgically implanted in his feet? "


And I imagine that the day tRump apologizes for the nasty thing he said about John McCain ("I like people who weren't captured") and stops denigrating people who have been in the service, that's when people will stop holding his bone spurs against him.


People who got captured or shot down during a war didn't do those things on purpose. He has a nasty mouth and he needs to have more respect for people who DID end up in the service.


And no...managing to avoid STDs from diseased vaginas was NOT his "personal Vietnam"


https://people.com/politics/trump-boasted-of-avoiding-stds-while-dating-vaginas-are-landmines-it-was-my-personal-vietnam/

Not even close. The man makes me gag.

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Response to Squeek (Reply #17)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 01:05 AM

18. Trump has a healthy respect for the military

Far better than the disdain Slick Willie and the Marxist Muslim have for the military.

You support the party of Maxine Waters, Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi, Al Sharpton, and Barney Frank and you DARE to talk about respect for the military???????

Fuck McCain. HE was the asshole with a nasty mouth.

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Response to Squeek (Reply #17)

Sun Dec 9, 2018, 11:49 PM

24. Agree 100%.

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Response to oflguy (Original post)

Mon Dec 10, 2018, 11:21 AM

26. Winning!

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Response to oflguy (Original post)

Thu Dec 13, 2018, 07:54 AM

27. Go get an x-ray. If looks like a hoof, quit wearing boots & walking on hard concrete.



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Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Reply #27)

Thu Dec 13, 2018, 10:20 AM

28. Thanks for that nostalgia

I'm not sure what it has to do with the thread, but I enjoyed watching it.

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Response to oflguy (Original post)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 01:35 AM

31. Bone Spurs are painful.

If you wear work boots all day, and are on hard concrete surfaces during that time, you will develop bone spurs.

Dr. showed me x-rays of my feet & it was scary !
Basically, foot grows another bone but looks like a hook.
Basically, I was growing a 'horses or cleft hoof' ...

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Response to RATFINK_5.0 (Reply #31)

Sun Feb 24, 2019, 09:19 AM

32. What critics of Trump are ignoring is Trump did not just dream up the spurs

On September 17, 1968 - Trump's 1-Y classification came a month after he underwent an “Armed Forces Physical Examination,” according to Selective Service records, which note the results of the exam as “DISQ.” While the military records do not further detail why Trump was granted the 1-Y deferment, a 1992 biography of the businessman by journalist Wayne Barrett reported that Trump received the medical deferment following the September 17, 1968 exam. He was diagnosed with bone spurs in his heels.

The military is not in the habit of accepting people that need foot surgery. The only surgery one can expect the military to perform prior to enlisting is a sex change.

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Response to oflguy (Reply #32)

Wed Mar 6, 2019, 12:33 PM

33. They got my wisdom teeth before I left boot camp.

Last edited Wed Mar 6, 2019, 09:10 PM - Edit history (1)

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Response to FreeWheelBurning (Reply #33)

Wed Mar 6, 2019, 06:04 PM

34. And?

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Response to oflguy (Reply #34)

Wed Mar 6, 2019, 07:32 PM

35. It was a follow up to the last line of your post

Last edited Wed Mar 6, 2019, 09:10 PM - Edit history (1)

"The only surgery one can expect the military to perform prior to enlisting is a sex change. "

You can almost guarantee that the Navy will pull your wisdom teeth if there is the slightest chance they may become a problem.

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Response to FreeWheelBurning (Reply #35)

Wed Mar 6, 2019, 08:42 PM

36. I guess I lied then

since dental work is surgery

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Response to oflguy (Reply #36)

Wed Mar 6, 2019, 09:09 PM

37. If it is not surgery it is the closest I ever came to it

My bottom teeth were impacted so my gums were opened, the teeth removed and then the gums were sutured back up. I was handed some pain medication and told to walk back to the barracks for the rest of the day.

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