Lifelife

Wed Jan 16, 2019, 09:15 PM

This day in history January 17

On January 17, 1991, U.S. and its allies began Operation Desert Storm. Operation Desert Storm began when the U.S. and allied forces began launching cruise missiles from naval vessels. The United States warned Iraq of the potential assault after they invaded Kuwait in August 1990, and on January 17, the United States, Britain, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait launched fighter-bombers, attack planes, and F-15s to raid Iraqi military targets.


The United States also authorized naval ships in the Arabian Peninsula to launch ground-hugging cruise missiles at various pre-determined targets. The ships would launch fifty Tomahawk missiles against Iraqi forces. Operation Desert Storm lasted until the end of February, when President George H. W. Bush declared Kuwait liberated of Iraqi forces after the Battle of Medina Ridge. (The History Channel)

2 replies, 101 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 2 replies Author Time Post
Reply This day in history January 17 (Original post)
oflguy Jan 16 OP
Currentsitguy Jan 17 #1
oflguy Jan 17 #2

Response to oflguy (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2019, 07:14 AM

1. As it happened


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Currentsitguy (Reply #1)

Thu Jan 17, 2019, 01:41 PM

2. The Iraqi people, Saddam Hussein, and the world doubted the resolve of the American people

to fight a war. A symptom of the Vietnam War, the world considered the American people and its military to be weak in spirit, even cowards, because they watched so many news stories of citizen protests of the war and heard stories of citizens spitting on returning veterans, among other harassments.


The Iraqi people had little respect or fear of US military might. In reality, what the American people feared most was a redo of the Vietnam war, which was fought in a very limited fashion, all the while as US soldiers died in fruitless engagements laced in politics that were never designed to annihilate the enemy.


This time it would be different. George H. W. Bush, a veteran of WW II, understood that generals plan and fight war, not presidents like Lyndon Johnson, who planned strategy and set rules of engagement in the Oval Office. History proved Johnson was not a strategist and had no business running a war.

Still, Saddam Hussein did not learn from his humiliation in Kuwait. Years later when UN inspectors were locked out of facilities when they tried to verify Saddam's possession of chemical weapons, he again thumbed his nose at the world.

He paid the ultimate price for his arrogance.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Lifelife