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nolidad

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Member since: Sun May 25, 2014, 02:43 PM
Number of posts: 20,302

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The Last Full Measure of Their Devotion

Memorial Day weekend in the U.S. can be a time of mixed feelings. On the one hand, it’s the unofficial beginning of summer. On the other hand, for those mourning the loss in war of a close relative or loved one, there is a deep and personal sense of grief, mingled with pride for their service.

On this day, besides the joy of spending time with family and friends – hopefully outdoors, in the beauty of God’s creation – we honor our heroes. Around the country, people will gather to remember those who, in the immortal words of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, gave "the last full measure of their devotion" for the country they loved – the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. armed forces throughout the country’s history, ordinary people who showed extraordinary courage and sacrifice in times of crisis.

Other countries also set aside a day to remember those who fought and died in wars. In Israel, that day is Yom HaZikaron, or Israel Memorial Day, which was observed earlier this month. In England, on Remembrance Day, which takes place on November 11, the entire country observes two minutes of silence in honor of their war dead (this is also a memorable and deeply affecting custom in Israel on Yom HaZikaron).

These sorts of public observances are valuable because they instill in us a sense of gratitude for our soldiers, who put their lives on the line so that we can enjoy the comforts and conveniences that we do. It is so easy for us to forget that our lives are not wholly our own – they are built upon a foundation of God’s goodness and grace, and the blood, toil, and sacrifice of others. Memorial Day gives us the opportunity to remember that fact.

So, this weekend, let us indeed enjoy the company of family and friends, and look forward to the pleasures of summer. But let us do more as well. Let us take a moment to pray for all those grieving the loss of a loved one in the service of their country, asking God to strengthen those who mourn. Let us remember the soldiers who died defending the freedoms we all too often take for granted, as well as those who live with the physical and psychological wounds from their time of service. Let us pray for the safety of those men and women who, even now, are standing at the front lines of the war on terror in dark and dangerous corners of the world. And let us pray for the day when God will bless all of us with His most precious gift of shalom, peace.

Honest Abama!

So many of his truths !

Here’s PROOF Hillary lied about being hacked

https://thehornnews.com/secret-smoking-gun-proof-clinton-going-jail/

I am starting to feel bad for HIllary- it goes from bad to worse for her.

Obama's Foreign Policy Guru Boasts of How the Administration Lied to Sell the Iran Deal

It’s hardly any wonder that Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes has a "mind meld" with his boss, the president. According to a David Samuels New York Times Magazine article to be published Sunday and already posted to the website, Rhodes, like Barack Obama, is contemptuous of "the American foreign-policy establishment." What Obama calls the "Washington playbook" dictating the sorts of responses available to American policymakers, Rhodes calls the "Blob."

The Blob includes "editors and reporters at The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Yorker," etc. It also encompasses, according to Rhodes, Obama's former secretary of state Hillary Clinton, and the administration's first defense secretary Robert Gates. Presumably Leon Panetta, former Pentagon chief and CIA director, who goes on the record to criticize Rhodes and the president, is also part of the Blob, alongside "other Iraq-war promoters from both parties who now whine incessantly about the collapse of the American security order in Europe and the Middle East." In other words, the emotion driving the administration's foreign policy is contempt—contempt for allies, colleagues, and the generations of American policymakers who built the post-WWII international order, ensuring relative global stability, and peace and prosperity at home.

Samuels's profile is an amazing piece of writing about the Holden Caulfield of American foreign policy. He's a sentimental adolescent with literary talent (Rhodes published one short story before his mother's connections won him a job in the world of foreign policy), and high self regard, who thinks that everyone else is a phony. Those readers who found Jeffrey Goldberg's picture of Obama in his March Atlantic profile refreshing for the president's willingness to insult American allies publicly will be similarly cheered here by Rhodes's boast of deceiving American citizens, lawmakers, and allies over the Iran deal. Conversely, those who believe Obama risked American interests to take a cheap shot at allies from the pedestal of the Oval Office will be appalled to see Rhodes dancing in the end zone to celebrate the well-packaged misdirections and even lies—what Rhodes and others call a "narrative"—that won Obama his signature foreign policy initiative.


"Like Obama," writes Samuels:

Rhodes is a storyteller who uses a writer's tools to advance an agenda that is packaged as politics but is often quite personal. He is adept at constructing overarching plotlines with heroes and villains, their conflicts and motivations supported by flurries of carefully chosen adjectives, quotations and leaks from named and unnamed senior officials. He is the master shaper and retailer of Obama's foreign-policy narratives, at a time when the killer wave of social media has washed away the sand castles of the traditional press.
As Rhodes admits, it's not that hard to shape the narrative. "All these newspapers used to have foreign bureaus," Rhodes said. "Now they don't. They call us to explain to them what's happening in Moscow and Cairo. Most of the outlets are reporting on world events from Washington. The average reporter we talk to is 27 years old, and their only reporting experience consists of being around political campaigns. That's a sea change. They literally know nothing."

In Rhodes's "narrative" about the Iran deal, negotiations started when the ostensibly moderate Hassan Rouhani was elected president, providing an opening for the administration to reach out in friendship. In reality, as Samuels gets administration officials to admit, negotiations began when "hardliner" Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was still president. It was Rhodes who framed the Iran deal as a choice between peace and war, and it was Rhodes who set up a messaging unit to sell the deal that created an "echo chamber" in the press. " Laura Rozen was my RSS feed," says Tanya Somanader, the 31-year-old who managed @TheIranDeal twitter feed. "She would just find everything and retweet it."

Obama at the white house correspondents dinner

Watched Obama at his last WH correspondents dinner. Laughed my head off! His jokes were truly hilarious.
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