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Cold Warrior

Profile Information

Gender: Male
Home country: USA
Current location: London, UK
Member since: Sun Aug 24, 2014, 05:49 AM
Number of posts: 4,383

Journal Archives

Wow! A brand new thread about scaring gays straight through Christianity

got locked before I could watch the video and respond. Well done!

The Mandela Effect

One of our former posters liked to speak of this. Having watched my first American football game in a decade with an American colleague who is a firm CT kinda guy, I was reminded of this and discussed it with him a bit. First, what is it?

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There’s an unexplained phenomenon that you’ve probably experienced without knowing what it’s called, and it’s garnering more and more attention lately. "The Mandela effect" is what the internet is calling those curious instances in which many of us are certain we remember something a particular way, but it turns out we’re incorrect.

The name of the theory comes from many people feeling certain they could remember Nelson Mandela dying while he was still in prison back in the ’80s. Contrary to what many thought, Mandela’s actual death was on Dec. 5, 2013, despite some people claiming to remember seeing clips of his funeral on TV.

These false memories have some people thinking their memory sucks, but some wonder if they’ve gone to a parallel universe, or if time travelers have gone to the past and slightly affected our present, or if they’re simply losing their freakin’ minds. Whichever it is, what’s most interesting about the Mandela effect is that so many individuals share the same false memories.
https://www.buzzfeed.com/christopherhudspeth/crazy-examples-of-the-mandela-effect-that-will-make-you-ques?utm_term=.oyAxxQ2aw#.dxMAAbkNo
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Even the name is stupid. I happened to be on a plane to Frankfurt (Pan Am even) when Mandela was released from jail with a bunch of ABC reporters sent to cover the story. And cover it they did. So if one doesn't remember the wall-to-wall media coverage of his release, that's stupid.

If I look at some of the examples, they seem a bit trivial (or stupid).

1. Oscar Mayer bologna is spelt with an "a" not an "e," i.e. Oscar Meyer. Well to any of us who grew up singing the bologna song, that's obvious. However, if you did not and were asked to spell the word, you would probably spell it with the conventional "e" spelling.

3. “We Are the Champions” by Queen ends differently than many recall. No it doesn't. The album Queen version indeed does not have the final tag, "we are the champions of the world," BUT their performance for Revenge of the Nerds certainly does.

12. People think the Mona Lisa is smiling now, but she used to be emotionless. I don't. Do you? I've seen the Mona Lisa many times in the Louvre but it never occured to me that she was "emotionless."

20. Fruit Loops is actually spelled “Froot Loops.” Ok, I don't eat children's breakfast cereals and have no children. If you asked me how it was spelt, I would simply say "Fruit Loops" beause that is the default, English spelling and I have no reason to believe otherwise.

These "anomalies" seem to fall into two categories. First, a person with no knowledge (or interest) in something will remember things in the "default" way as in (20). Second, the object (phrase, picture, etc.) has been repurposed and many people remember that rather than the original as in (3). Another example of the latter (listed on a different site) is that the line from Fields of Dreams is actually "Build it and HE will come," not "THEY." Yes it is because the protagonist was interested in one player, Shoeless Joe. However, to use the phrase in a wider conversation and a more generic sense, "they" makes a lot more sense.


Jesus in Wonderland

https://m.

My head hurts, my feet stink, and I don't love Jesus

https://m.

Paul Bocuse: Top French chef dies at 91

Sad news. Made the world’s best truffle soup in his Lyon restaurant.

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France's most-celebrated chef Paul Bocuse has died at the age of 91, after suffering from Parkinson's disease for several years.

He died in his famous restaurant near Lyon, a local chef close to the family told AFP news agency.
French President Emmanuel Macron paid tribute, describing him as the "incarnation of French cuisine".

Bocuse rose to fame in the 1970s as a proponent of "nouvelle cuisine", a healthier form of cooking.
The movement "profoundly changed" French cooking, Mr Macron said.

"His name alone summed up French gastronomy in its generosity and respect for tradition but also its inventiveness," the French president said.

Chefs across the country would be "crying in their kitchens", he added.

Bocuse's restaurant, L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges, has had three Michelin stars since 1965 and he was named "chef of the century" by Michelin's rival guide, the Gault-Millau, in 1989, and again by the Culinary Institute of America in 2011.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-42758189

Invitation to the Blues

Perhaps my favourite from Tom...


Happy National Popcorn Day to All!

Alexa informed me of this when I wished her a good morning. Tattinger and popcorn tonight!!!


NATIONAL POPCORN DAY
National Popcorn Day is annually observed January 19th. This time-honored treat can be sweet or savory, caramelized, buttered or plain, molded into a candied ball or tossed with nuts and chocolate. However, it is enjoyed, enjoy it on National Popcorn Day, January 19th.

The word “corn” in Old English meant “grain” or more specifically the most prominent grain grown in a region. As maize was the most common grain in early America, the word “corn” was aptly applied.

As early as the 16th century, popcorn was used in headdresses worn during Aztec ceremonies honoring Tlaloc, their god of maize and fertility. Early Spanish explorers were fascinated by the corn that burst into what looked like a white flower.

Popcorn started becoming popular in the United States in the middle 1800s. It wasn’t until Charles Cretors, a candy-store owner, developed a machine for popping corn with steam that the tasty treat became more abundantly poppable. By 1900 he had horse-drawn popcorn wagons going through the streets of Chicago.
https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-popcorn-day-january-19/

#FollowTheWhiteRabbit

MSM = Mockingbird Stream Media

The author, while a bit hyperbolic, makes some interesting and demonstratable points. For example, google images of “white couples” and “black couples” and the results speak for themselves.

https://m.

Hey gang! Has ANYONE here seen this yet???

https://m.

+5

Bad News Bears

Trumps doctor says he is in excellent health!

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